Custer Smiles from Hell about His Pipeline

“Wonderful U.S. and Canada!”

Tommywommy's Friend

Custer’s Pipeline & Genocide Denial

Genocide denial is part of the steel that drills the oil in “Custer’s Pipeline,” is part of what moves the pens making lying papers that are stealing and have stolen the promised sovereignty of American Indians, and what makes the modern day Custers feel joy when they succeed and rage when they fail.


Historic meeting ends on pessimistic note

Determining the pipeline’s effects on cultural places appeared to have been a cursory and simplistic process.

Longtime efforts by preservation professionals to protect the more ineffable indigenous sites – vision quest places, pilgrimage trails, natural resources critical to a craft, habitats of culturally important animals and even places with no material manifestations at all – were disregarded.

“I admired how you voted against the U.N. Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples on September 13th.”

A Young Custer

“But using winter time to feign concern over their cultural locations was wonderful and effective. I laughed hearing Mentz say, ”’A survey in the middle of winter with several feet of snow and no ground visibility? What kind of survey is that?'”

“I can answer that, it’s my survey.

Tommywommy's Friend

Cultural preservation was not the only casualty of the fast-tracked process, according to Steele, who read aloud portions of Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act on protecting sites in aboriginal homelands. ”You have to follow your own laws,” he chided.

“And my pipeline is going along just as planned.”

Photobucket

“Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha , Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha…

At one point, an Entrix consultant offered to give Native people $400 per day to walk alongside the machinery during construction; however, the job came without authority to stop work if a site was struck.

Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha , Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha , Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha , Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha , Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha , Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha , Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha , Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha , Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha , Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha , Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha , Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha , Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha , Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha , Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha , Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha , Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha,!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!Ha!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Lucifer’s calling me back now.”

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These Too Died for Their Country

My stepfather’s brother died with other Marines on the beach at Guadacanal during World War II.

My best high school friend was killed in the early days of the Vietnam War.

These men will be honored at next Monday’s Memorial Day ceremonies along with nearly a million of their soldier, sailor, marine, coast guard and air force compatriots who gave their lives in military service. No distinction is made between the hundreds of thousands who died fighting in wars most Americans would consider righteous and the hundreds of thousands who were killed in the furtherance of bad causes or died in vain because their criminal or reckless leaders sent them into harm’s way for greed, stupidity or empire. Those who fought in gray uniforms in a war of secession are given the same reverence, the same moments of silence, the same commemoration of sacrifice as those who wore blue into battle.

It doesn’t matter whether they were white boys from the First Tennessee Infantry Regiment who fell in the land-grabbing war with Mexico in 1847, or black soldiers of the 93rd Infantry Division fighting Germans in the war to end all wars, or Japanese-Americans of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team slugging their way through Italy while their relatives lived incarcerated in camps back home.

It doesn’t matter whether their name was Hern├índez, or Hansen, or Hashimoto. Nor whether they caught enemy shrapnel or a bullet from friendly fire. Nor whether they were drafted or volunteered. Nor whether they died fighting for liberty more than 200 years ago at Bunker Hill or crushing it more than 100 years ago in the boondocks of the Philippines. On Memorial Day all American warriors who lost their lives are honored because they did lose their lives.  

With one exception.

My great-great-great-great-great uncle was killed by U.S. soldiers during the Second Seminole War. Other distant relatives were killed during the Third Seminole War. Killed for trying to hold onto freedom, land, the right to self-determination.

Whether they killed warriors and women on the banks of the Pease River in Texas, the Washita River in Kansas, Sand Creek in Colorado, or Wounded Knee Creek in South Dakota; whether they fought Shawnee in Indiana, Asakiwaki in Wisconsin, Lakota and Cheyenne in Montana, Chiricahua in Arizona, Nez Perce in Idaho or Modocs in California, the men in blue who were killed in the Indian Wars are among those who will be honored Monday.

But the thousands of warriors they killed – the ancestors of us original Americans – aren’t counted for the ultimately futile but unhesitating sacrifice they made for the freedom of their people. On Memorial Day, they are invisible. Monuments to the Rebel dead can be found in practically every town of the Confederacy. Memorials to Indian resistance are next to non-existent.  

Attempts have been made to correct this. In 2002, the 1909 memorial on the Denver Capitol grounds that honored the 22 soldiers killed as they and their compatriots massacred the southern Arapaho and Cheyenne at Sand Creek got a new plaque to replace the one calling that slaughter a Civil War victory for the Union. Seventeen years ago, the Custer Battlefield National Monument was renamed Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument, and now, intermixed with the white marble 7th Cavalry gravestones are a double handful of red marble gravestones for fallen Indian warriors. Steps in the right direction. But not nearly enough.

Scores of sites throughout America could display memorial statues commemorating events with succinct plaques: From this site in 17– or 18–, the Anishinaabe (or Comanche, or Alibamu) were removed to reservations in ——- after 50 (or 120, or 350) of their number were killed in a surprise attack by the U.S. soldiers, some of whom cut off breasts or scrota for use as trophies and tobacco pouches. Their lands were turned over to settlers, miners and railroad builders and the city/town of —— was built on their burial grounds.

Monday, when the nation’s war dead are remembered, when we are supposed to put aside political and ethnic divisions for a few moments of introspection, many of our politicians still won’t take a break from the lies – past and current lies – for which too many men and women went prematurely into the ground. Monday, for the eighth time and final time, Mister Bush will be stealing the rubric of patriotism, milking it for all the tears he can. Monday, we will hear from him and many another politicians plenty about liberty, freedom and sacrifice associated with American wars, but nothing about the plunder, rapine and imperial machinations associated with some of those wars, the Mexican War, the Philippines War, the Iraq War, and, of course, the Indian Wars.

Let me be crystal clear. I’m for moving ahead, for transcendence, Indians and non-Indians alike. We live in the 21st Century, and people alive now bear no responsibility and should carry no guilt for what was done more than a century or two ago.

But Monday is Memorial Day, memory day, and, just as we do not forget the men who froze at Valley Forge or took bullets at Fort Wagner or were blown up at Khe Sanh, there is no excuse for the nation to retreat into convenient amnesia and forget the deaths of those who resisted the theft and genocide led by leaders masquerading as divinely inspired messengers of freedom in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Until the nation remembers all its dead warriors, you’ll pardon me if my Memorial Day reverence is tempered with rage.

Climate Disintegration is a Human Rights Issue

( – promoted by navajo)

This is an attempt, by using the Eight Stages of Genocide by Gregory H. Stanton, to show how climate change is a human rights issue in our own backyard.

The Inuit in Alaska are the “canary in the coal mine,” while the rising sea levels from the melting Arctic ice endanger the coast line of Hawaii. As a measure of awareness and hopefully of prevention, six stages of genocide are given in word only in between quoted materials. The last two stages, extermination and denial, are not cited. Allow me to explain my justification.

If and only if the intent to commit genocide could be shown in terms of the state deliberately disallowing outside aid or the state not giving direct necessary aid itself for the sustaining of life, then it should be concluded that that said state willfully used a natural disaster as the extermination stage of genocide and then denied that extermination.


The 8 Stages of Genocide

1. Classification:

Global Warming & Human Rights Gets Hearing on the World Stage

Sheila [Watt-Cloutier] has provided a powerful description of some of the ways global warming is already affecting individuals and communities throughout the hemisphere. I would like to take a few minutes to discuss the relationship between these impacts and human rights, and what that means for the obligations of Members of the Organization of American States.

The 8 Stages of Genocide

2. Symbolization:


Sheila so clearly described — global warming has particular impacts on indigenous peoples throughout the hemisphere. The relationship between human rights and global warming must therefore be evaluated in the context of indigenous rights.

The 8 Stages of Genocide

3. Dehumanization:

World CO2 levels at record high, scientists warn

The concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has reached a record high, according to new figures that renew fears that climate change could begin to slide out of control.

Scientists at the Mauna Loa observatory in Hawaii say that CO2 levels in the atmosphere now stand at 387 parts per million (ppm), up almost 40% since the industrial revolution and the highest for at least the last 650,000 years.

– snip –

Scientists say the shift could indicate that the Earth is losing its natural ability to soak up billions of tons of carbon each year. Climate models assume that about half our future emissions will be re-absorbed by forests and oceans, but the new figures confirm this may be too optimistic. If more of our carbon pollution stays in the atmosphere, it means emissions will have to be cut by more than currently projected to prevent dangerous levels of global warming.

The 8 Stages of Genocide

4. Organization:


Because indigenous peoples’ traditional lands and natural resources are essential to their physical and cultural survival, the Commission and the Court have acknowledged that environmental damage — like that being caused by global warming — can interfere with the rights of indigenous peoples to life and to cultural integrity. We must keep these principles in mind in considering the relationship of the following rights to the effects of global warming.


The 8 Stages of Genocide

5. Polarization:

Source

…it is estimated that between 3 and 7% of carbon added to the atmosphere today will still be in the atmosphere after 100,000 years (Archer 2005, Lenton & Britton 2006). This is supported by studies of the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum, a large naturally occurring release of carbon 55 million years ago that apparently took ~200,000 years to fully return to pre-event conditions (Zachos et al. 2001).


The 8 Stages of Genocide

6. Preparation:


Global warming is human rights issue: Nobel nominee

How hot is it? So hot that Inuit people around the Arctic Circle are using air conditioners for the first time. And running out of the hard-packed snow they need to build igloos. And falling through melting ice when they hunt.

Gregory Stanton: The Eight Stages of Genocide


To conclude, the premises is restated. If and only if the intent to commit genocide could be shown in terms of the state deliberately disallowing outside aid or the state not giving direct necessary aid itself for the sustaining of life, then it should be concluded that that said state willfully used a natural disaster as the extermination stage of genocide and then denied that extermination. Whatever the case, climate change is a human rights issue. That much is certain. The problem with unintended consequences and intended consequences is that the consequences are the same, though probably not in the same degree, when the forces of nature are involved; consequently, natural forces that human beings have unleashed or made worse by being poor stewards of the earth. What counts, is what states do after a situation that was beyond control. Whether or not the destructive forces of nature are “conveniently used” as the extermination stage of genocide and for cultural genocide for that matter will have to be watched and be questioned as –


…concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has reached a record high, according to new figures that renew fears that climate change could begin to slide out of control.

– without exception.

As long as there as those who idealize butchers like Stalin and there are private contractors like Blackwater, using a natural disaster for the last two stages of extermination and denial will remain more of a possibility than we would like to recognize.

(emphasis mine)


Michelle Goldberg, “Kingdom Coming: The Rise of Christian Nationalism” p.160.

…Constitutional lawyer Edwin Vieira discussed Justice Anthony Kennedy’s majority opinion…which struck down that state’s antisodomy law…Vieira accused Kennedy of relying on “Marxist, Leninist, Satanic principles drawn from foreign law… “What to do about Communist judges in thrall to the Devil? Vieira said, “Here again I draw on the wisdom of Stalin. We’re talking about the greatest political figure of the twentieth century…He had a slogan, and it worked well for him whenever he ran into difficulty. No man, no problem.'”


Source

The Artificial Famine/Genocide(Holodomor) in Ukraine 1932-33. A Man-Made Famine raged through Ukraine, the ethnic-Ukrainian region of northern Caucasus (i.e. Kuban), and the lower Volga River region in 1932-33. This resulted in the death of between 7 to 10 million people, mainly Ukrainians. This was instigated by Soviet leader Joseph Stalin and his henchman Lazar Kaganovich.


Blackwater Down

The frightening — and possibly illegal — presence of heavily armed private forces in New Orleans only demonstrates what everyone already feared: the utter breakdown of the government.

The men from Blackwater USA arrived in New Orleans right after Katrina hit.

The company known for its private security work guarding senior US diplomats in Iraq beat the federal government and most aid organizations to the scene in another devastated Gulf. About 150 heavily armed Blackwater troops dressed in full battle gear spread out into the chaos of New Orleans. Officially, the company boasted of its forces “join[ing] the hurricane relief effort.” But its men on the ground told a different story.


Katrina, Rita and the Houma Tribe: A Nation Recovers

Louisiana may be best known as the home of Mardi Gras and the football Saints, as a stirring pot of jazz and blues and zesty cuisine. Thanks to hurricanes Katrina and Rita, it may forever be the memory stick for disaster, for images of broken levees and a stifling Superdome, and for tales of heroism and despair in now-familiar places like the Ninth Ward of New Orleans.

But it is also Indian Country, land of the mostly forgotten. It is home to the United Houma Nation, nearly half of whose members were displaced up and down the bayou, their homes battered by hurricane winds or flooded by avalanches of water.

“Our people suffered a lot, and many people don’t know that,” said Brenda Dardar Robichaux, principal chief of the Houma Nation. “We’re still recovering, and it’s been a slow process.”

Climate disintegration is a human rights issue. It is time for the United Nations to consider expanding the definition of the extermination stage of genocide in the face of present and looming climate devastation on the horizon to include a state using a natural disaster as the extermination stage of genocide, as well as the subsequent denial thereof.


The legal definition of genocide

Deliberately inflicting conditions of life calculated to destroy a group
includes the deliberate deprivation of resources needed for the group’s physical survival, such as clean water, food, clothing, shelter or medical services. Deprivation of the means to sustain life can be imposed through confiscation of harvests, blockade of foodstuffs, detention in camps, forcible relocation or expulsion into deserts.


The IPCC’s vice chairman Mohan Munasinghe warns against the economic and social consequences of global warming

Obama adopted into the Crow Nation

( – promoted by navajo)

Cross posted at Daily Kos.

Barack Obama was formally adopted into the Crow Nation today — and given the name “One Who Helps People Throughout the Land.”

I was shocked (although I shouldn’t have been) to learn that he is the first presidential candidate who has ever visited the reservation of the Crow Nation, located in the state of Montana.

In a speech given yesterday, he made strong promises to address historic and present wrongs, and promised to bring improvements in both health care and education to America’s reservations:

The visit was meaningful, said Darrin Old Coyote, a member of the tribe who wore an elaborate headdress. “To have us left out all these years, and then for him to come here, it shows respect, and it makes us optimistic,” Old Coyote said.

The visit also had political value for Obama. The members of the Crow Nation vote as “a close knit bloc,” Old Coyote said. “Now that Senator Obama is part of the family, that is where we will go.”

The Billings Gazette gave some specific details of how Obama intended to address U.S. relationships with the tribes, including his commitment to having a Native American policy advisor on staff and “to holding an annual summit to ensure tribal needs are met.”

Obama talked about understanding what it is like to be viewed as an outsider from mainstream society and to struggle financially.

“I want you to know that I will never forget you,” he said.

The United States government cannot undo wrongs against Indian peoples, he said

But they can elect a president committed to do what’s right for Native Americans.

“And since now I’m a member of the family you know I won’t break my promises to my brothers and sisters.”

I’ve read discussion here and there about native people’s interest in Obama, given that he is from Hawaii. Beyond the powerful symbolism of his candidacy, it seems he has both a genuine concern for marginalized people, and an unerring ability to convey that concern.

Those who argue that Obama isn’t a “real American” perhaps need a lesson in just who the “real Americans” are.