Michael Medved And Genocide Denial, AGAIN

( – promoted by navajo)

“Few opinions that I will express” are more certain that Michael Medved denies genocide. No, it is not an opinion, he literally denies genocide (1st article from 2007).

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Reject the Lie of White “Genocide” Against Native Americans

Few opinions I’ve expressed on air have produced a more indignant, outraged reaction than my repeated insistence that the word “genocide” in no way fits as a description of the treatment of Native Americans by British colonists or, later, American settlers.

Consequently, Medved has a current egregious example of his genocide denial.

Michael Medved not only denies the genocide from  The Massacre For Which Thanksgiving Is Named; he also by having stated “‘genocide’ in no way fits as a description of the treatment of Native Americans by British colonists or, later, American settlers,” necessarily denies the genocide of the Washita Massacre. Consequently, its anniversary fell on Thanksgiving this year.

Michael Medved  therefore engages in “the highest form of hate speech and the last stage of genocide.” He insults every deceased American Indian who ever was the victim of genocide, “madden(s), insult(s) and humiliate(s) the survivors,” and does a “double killing” every time he does it.


ADL’S GENOCIDE DENIAL MUST BE CHALLENGED

Genocide scholars classify denial as the highest form of hate speech and the last stage of genocide. Nobel laureate Elie Weisel calls it a “double killing.”

Israel Charny, executive director of the Institute on the Holocaust and Genocide in Jerusalem, explains, “Denials of known events of genocide must be treated as acts of bitter and malevolent psychological aggression, certainly against the victims, but really against all of human society, for such denials literally celebrate genocidal violence and in the process suggestively calls for renewed massacres-of the same people or of others. Such denials also madden, insult and humiliate the survivors, the relatives of the dead, and the entire people of the victims.”

Genocide denial also increases the probability of future genocides. “The black hole of forgetting is the negative force that results in future genocides,” writes Professor Gregory Stanton in The Eight Stages of Genocide.


Professor of Philosophy Henry Theriault Discusses Comparative Dimension of Genocide Denial

Nevertheless, denial of the genocide of Native Americans is still very strong. It works primarily through omission; people just refuse to talk about the issue. There was a strong backlash to newspaper editorials urging free discussion of this topic, which were published in 1992, the fifth centenary of the European discovery of the Americas. That denial has continued in the past decade, and deniers try to explain the extermination of the Native Americans as just an unfortunate event.

Even when Native Americans sue the government to reclaim their lands on violated treaty grounds, the courts usually throw these cases out. Moreover, when uranium was discovered in the 20th century in Native American reservations, the US claimed the uranium in the name of national security, without proper compensation.

I will not hate the White Man,

Though he encroaches on the land.

He has not yet realized my people are his,

And his is mine this time again.

I will not hate the White Man,

Though he’s made languages fade away.

His lands are lost from him,

He needs someone to pay.

I will not hate the White Man,

Though he glorifies genocide.

He cannot stop fighting his crusades and wars,

His heart from himself he hides.

I will not hate the White Man,

The One Direction won’t let it be.

We both go through chaos and change,

Throughout eternity.

I will not hate the White Man,

But I will not be like him.

I forgive him for Christianizing my clan,

That I’ll never see again.

I forgive the White Man,

And though my land is long lost.

I’ll keep that medicine deep,

Deep within my heart.

I’ll never be the White Man.