Powwow 101: Grass Dancers (Photo Diary)

GD 3 photo DSCN6840_zps9b22a62c.jpg

The powwow is a public celebration and demonstration of community pride in Indian culture and a way of honoring Native American heritage. At the present time, there are powwows held in all fifty states and in most of the Canadian provinces. Some are held on reservations and reserves, while others are held in places such as universities and colleges. There are many who feel that the male grass dancers represented the oldest style of dancing at the modern powwows. Originally, the dancers had braids of grass dangling from their belts and during the dance the dancers would move so that the grass braids swayed like the prairie grass in the wind. Today’s dancers use ribbons instead of grass, but the idea maintaining the swaying movement continues. A good grass dancer is balanced: if he makes a series of steps with his right foot, then these steps are mirrored with the left foot. Shown below are some of the grass dancers at the 45th annual Kyi-Yo powwow at the University of Montana in Missoula.

GD 4 photo DSCN6841_zps41fdb653.jpg

GD 5 photo DSCN6842_zpsfcfc1c66.jpg

GD 6 photo DSCN6844_zpsd3bcd4ab.jpg

GD 7 photo DSCN6852_zpsd1b6d16c.jpg

GD 8 photo DSCN6857_zpse5f35780.jpg

GD 9 photo DSCN6859_zpscb02574d.jpg

GD 1 photo DSCN7193_zpscbcf1062.jpg

 photo DSCN7192_zps14a8d456.jpg

GD 2 photo DSCN6838_zpsc0721ab7.jpg

GD 10 photo DSCN6860_zpsb574406e.jpg

GD11 photo DSCN6862_zpsdce6e4b9.jpg

GD 12 photo DSCN6863_zps10408ee1.jpg

GD 13 photo DSCN6865_zps2d46703f.jpg

GD 14 photo DSCN6867_zpsd96cbd09.jpg

GD 15 photo DSCN6872_zpsd5f2112a.jpg

GD 16 photo DSCN6877_zpsf066ad1b.jpg

GD 17 photo DSCN7156_zps8ec52e74.jpg

GD 18 photo DSCN7157_zps43e2cc79.jpg

GD 19 photo DSCN7158_zps7bfc823e.jpg

GD 20 photo DSCN7161_zps395c6983.jpg

GD 21 photo DSCN7167_zps51984450.jpg

GD 22 photo DSCN7168_zps42b6a386.jpg

GD 23 photo DSCN7170_zps458fbf51.jpg

GD 24 photo DSCN7173_zpsa2670594.jpg

GD 25 photo DSCN7181_zps6085e44b.jpg

GD 26 photo DSCN7190_zps63779c52.jpg

Powwow 101: Fancy Dancers (Photo Diary)

FD 6 photo DSCN7216_zps40e6169d.jpg

FD 9 photo DSCN7222_zps55678a1b.jpg

The powwow is a public celebration and demonstration of community pride in Indian culture and a way of honoring Native American heritage. At the present time, there are powwows held in all fifty states and in most of the Canadian provinces. Some are held on reservations and reserves, while others are held in places such as universities and colleges. The male fancy dancers are usually crowd pleasers with their brightly colored outfits. They also wear two feather bustles: one high between the shoulders and one low, hanging from the waist. Shown below are some of the fancy dancers at the 45th annual Kyi-Yo powwow at the University of Montana in Missoula.

FD 3 photo DSCN7206_zpsde05a6e2.jpg

FD 4 photo DSCN7209_zps73bd421f.jpg

FD 5 photo DSCN7213_zps54753bce.jpg

FD 2 photo DSCN7205_zpsb8441db4.jpg

FD 1 photo DSCN7256_zps25b54161.jpg

FD 7 photo DSCN7218_zpse39e4b7f.jpg

FD 8 photo DSCN7221_zps2f2cb532.jpg

FD 10 photo DSCN7223_zps2740cd1a.jpg

FD 11 photo DSCN7230_zpsb7739f18.jpg

FD 12 photo DSCN7239_zps6922b35a.jpg

FD 13 photo DSCN7244_zps0257064c.jpg

FD 14 photo DSCN7245_zpsbb0498ff.jpg

FD 15 photo DSCN7246_zps541e2fc1.jpg

FD 16 photo DSCN7252_zps8ed81f75.jpg

The Powwow (Photo Diary)

Eagle Staff

It begins with the drums. This is the signal for the dancers to enter into the dance arbor, usually led by dancers carrying the eagle feather staff. This marks the Grand Entry which starts each powwow session. This is a powwow: the most common form of Indian celebration.

P 23 photo DSCN6957_zpsd9f1c9a5.jpg

The powwow itself is not a religious or spiritual ceremony; nor, in its current form, is it a particularly “ancient” celebration. The powwow is a public celebration and demonstration of community pride in Indian culture and a way of honoring Native American heritage.

Eagle Staff 2

Following the eagle staffs, carried by Fancy Dancers in the powwow shown above, are the flags-American, Canadian, tribal, MIA, state (this varies from powwow to powwow). At many powwows, following the flags are the “royalty” and other dignitaries.

Royalty

The dancers continue to file in-it is not uncommon for a grand entry to take a half an hour-until all dancers have entered the arbor.

Powwow 2009 1

On the other hand, for many people – dancers, drummers, and spectators – the powwow is also a spiritual experience and a spiritual ceremony. Many begin their participation in powwow by smudging: cleansing and spiritually purifying themselves, their dance regalia, and their drums with the smoke from sage or sweetgrass.

Background:

During the Dark Ages of American Indian Religious Freedom (1880 to 1934), the Indian Office (the current Bureau of Indian Affairs) and the local Indian agents discouraged all types of Indian dancing as barriers to civilization. Christian missionaries to the reservations often complained that Indian dances “inflamed animal passions and the immoral and uncivilized people.” Indian agents were told by the Commissioner of Indian Affairs to prohibit Indian dancing as such activities were deemed to be injurious to the moral welfare of the Indians.

The Baptist field matron for the Kiowa-Commanche Reservation in Oklahoma condemned powwow dancing in 1915:

“These dances are one of the breeding places of illegitimate children, which is becoming the shame of the tribe.”

The new superintendent for the Fort Peck Reservation in Montana addressed his concerns over Indian dances in 1917 by stating:

“I recommend the policy of repression and at the same time instruction to show the uselessness of these practices.”

On the other hand, non-Indian tourists had an interest in seeing the Indians dance. While Indian dancing was discouraged on the reservation, non-Indian groups often invited Indians to put on dances in off-reservation venues as a part of celebrations intended to attract tourists.

In 1911, for example, Colorado Springs, Colorado invited a group of Ute to be a part of an exhibition at an 8-day carnival. The Indians performed dances and other ceremonies that were discouraged at their reservation. The events, while not favored by the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, were popular with those attending the event.

In spite of attempts to eradicate Indian dances, the dances continued. In the off-reservation venues, the dancers would often be from different tribes and thus a kind of pan-Indianism developed in which the powwows were not a celebration of one particular Indian culture, but of Indianness in general.

FVCC 2009

Contemporary Powwows:

At the present time, there are powwows held in all fifty states and in most of the Canadian provinces. Some are held on reservations and reserves, while others are held in places such as universities and colleges. Some powwows are held in conjunction with tribal casinos.

People dance at powwows for many reasons. Some dance because they are Indian and this is a way of celebrating their heritage. Powwows are a time for renewing friendships, for seeing family and friends, for coming home.

Many powwows will include naming ceremonies, honoring ceremonies, and give-aways to mark significant life events, such as graduations, birth, marriage, and homecomings (particularly for veterans).

Some dance because they earn money in the contests. Many large powwows run dance contests and some dancers travel a powwow circuit, dancing at different powwows each weekend, and earning enough money through their winnings to stay on the road.

Dance contests are usually categorized by gender and age group. In addition, there may be categories for different types of dances. For men, this might include Fancy Dance, Traditional, Grass Dance, and Straight Dance. For women, this might include Traditional, Fancy Shawl, and Jingle Dress.

Some dance because of their personal spiritual beliefs and vision. It is not uncommon for Indians in the process of recovery from alcoholism and/or drug addiction to dance as a way of spiritually reinforcing their sobriety.

FVCC 2009 2

Grand Entry

Trad Dancer 1

Kyi-Yo:

For 45 years, the Indian students at the University of Montana have been holding the Kyi-Yo Powwow which draws dancers from throughout the region. Shown below are a few photographs from the latest powwow.

P 1 photo DSCN6966_zps0a2763b1.jpg

P 24 photo DSCN6964_zps0165a877.jpg

P 22 photo DSCN6956_zpsfb172480.jpg

P 21 photo DSCN6934_zps1454b416.jpg

P 20 photo DSCN6931_zps0ad26c8c.jpg

P 19 photo DSCN6925_zpsce0f7dc1.jpg

P 18 photo DSCN6921_zpsa6465754.jpg

P 17 photo DSCN6912_zps4baf11f1.jpg

P 16 photo DSCN6911_zps24315ce9.jpg

P 15 photo DSCN6908_zpsd67d5e18.jpg

P 14 photo DSCN6904_zpsbbb8d263.jpg

P 13 photo DSCN6903_zpsd1a23032.jpg

P 12 photo DSCN6902_zps919a3da5.jpg

P 11 photo DSCN6897_zps7a51ace4.jpg

P 10 photo DSCN6896_zps0c10e5ad.jpg

P 9 photo DSCN6895_zps03e65c11.jpg

P 8 photo DSCN6891_zpsc5caca86.jpg

P 7 photo DSCN6889_zpsf0ca9bc5.jpg

P 6 photo DSCN6840_zpse85a72a9.jpg

P 5 photo DSCN6835_zps0241c0cb.jpg

P 4 photo DSCN6833_zpsc2894d72.jpg

P 3 photo DSCN6832_zpsc14e3bdc.jpg

P 2 photo DSCN6830_zps392f6360.jpg

Powwow 101: Children (Photo Diary)

C 7 photo DSCN6881_zpsf9b29e68.jpg

For Indian people, powwows are about friends, family, and children. The powwow is a public celebration and demonstration of community pride in Indian culture and a way of honoring Native American heritage. At the present time, there are powwows held in all fifty states and in most of the Canadian provinces. Some are held on reservations and reserves, while others are held in places such as universities and colleges. Shown below are some of the children at the 45th annual Kyi-Yo powwow at the University of Montana in Missoula.

C 8 photo DSCN6882_zpsd494ac62.jpg

C 9 photo DSCN6884_zps1920e933.jpg

C 10 photo DSCN6885_zps3b25c751.jpg

C 1 photo DSCN6967c_zpsbfb361e2.jpg

C 2 photo DSCN6817_zps7f92e50f.jpg

C 3 photo DSCN6818_zps38a667f4.jpg

C 4 photo DSCN6829_zps09021328.jpg

C 5 photo DSCN6832_zpsa3212d59.jpg

C 6 photo DSCN6836_zps635f3e0f.jpg

C 11 photo DSCN6886_zps17398e9d.jpg

C 12 photo DSCN6949_zpsf1d1b4b5.jpg

C 13 photo DSCN6952_zpsf6a09fca.jpg

c 14 photo DSCN6954_zps35e5becc.jpg

C 15 photo DSCN6958_zpsdb94af78.jpg

c 16 photo DSCN6960_zps62da11cf.jpg

C 17 photo DSCN6961_zpsa658f6e8.jpg

C 18 photo DSCN6962_zps236c56cc.jpg

C 19 photo DSCN6965_zps2944a79c.jpg

C 20 photo DSCN6967a_zpsd041c8c7.jpg

C 21 photo DSCN6967b_zpse5f27dfe.jpg

Powwow 101: Men’s Traditional (Photo Diary)

MT 12 photo DSCN6941_zps3ce31e20.jpg

The powwow is a public celebration and demonstration of community pride in Indian culture and a way of honoring Native American heritage. At the present time, there are powwows held in all fifty states and in most of the Canadian provinces. Some are held on reservations and reserves, while others are held in places such as universities and colleges. One of the mainstays of most powwows is the men’s traditional dance which has its heritage is the older Plains Indian warrior dances. The dance regalia for the men’s traditional are characterized by a feather bustle. Shown below are some of the women’s fancy shawl dancers at the 45th annual Kyi-Yo powwow at the University of Montana in Missoula.

MT 1 photo DSCN7154_zpsdeda68a4.jpg

MT 2 photo DSCN6922_zps52938bfa.jpg

MT 3 photo DSCN6923_zps8f2afdd2.jpg

MT 4 photo DSCN6924_zpsa9e5b96a.jpg

MT 5 photo DSCN6927_zps3d7a8a01.jpg

MT photo DSCN6932_zpsa2ee21bb.jpg

MT 7 photo DSCN6933_zps22270372.jpg

MT 8 photo DSCN6936_zps23158f86.jpg

MT 9 photo DSCN6937_zps6d65af51.jpg

MT 10 photo DSCN6938_zps4c05e631.jpg

MT 11 photo DSCN6939_zps976f7269.jpg

MT 13 photo DSCN7058_zpsae9fac50.jpg

MT 14 photo DSCN7059_zpse1507d65.jpg

MT 15 photo DSCN7063_zps1826c485.jpg

MT 16 photo DSCN7066_zpsb34a794e.jpg

MT 17 photo DSCN7073_zps2f2d36a8.jpg

MT 18 photo DSCN7075_zps896747c9.jpg

MT 19 photo DSCN7077_zps7c17b1ed.jpg

MT 20 photo DSCN7087_zps90a5b93e.jpg

MT 21 photo DSCN7097_zps958080c9.jpg

MT 22 photo DSCN7098_zps4f37d0b7.jpg

MT 23 photo DSCN7099_zpsd8b88ee8.jpg

MT 24 photo DSCN7104_zps1d057e8e.jpg

MT 25 photo DSCN7107_zps81e3476c.jpg

MT 26 photo DSCN7108_zps7536aecf.jpg

MT 27 photo DSCN7115_zps037b18bd.jpg

MT 28 photo DSCN7118_zpse005ae95.jpg

MT 29 photo DSCN7128_zps57ae6ef6.jpg

MT 30 photo DSCN7143_zps1bfba294.jpg

MT 31 photo DSCN7144_zps5bb6acfd.jpg

MT 32 photo DSCN7146_zpsf9342094.jpg

MT 33 photo DSCN7148_zps30798067.jpg

Powwow 101: Women’s Jingle Dress (Photo Diary)

Jingle 11 photo DSCN6978_zpsb731e64f.jpg

The powwow is a public celebration and demonstration of community pride in Indian culture and a way of honoring Native American heritage. At the present time, there are powwows held in all fifty states and in most of the Canadian provinces. Some are held on reservations and reserves, while others are held in places such as universities and colleges. One of the common dances at many of these powwows is the women’s jingle dress dance.

The jingle dress dance regalia is distinctive: the dress is ideally adorned with 365 visible jingles which are metal cones made from chewing tobacco can lids. The dance is Anishinabe in origin and was developed from a dream or vision which appeared to a Midewiwin medicine man. Shown below are some of the jingle dress dancers at the 45th annual Kyi-Yo powwow at the University of Montana in Missoula.  

Jingle 1 photo DSCN6992_zps68d504ca.jpg

Jingle 2 photo DSCN6997_zpsb679ed4b.jpg

Jingle 3 photo DSCN6999_zps3416cda2.jpg

Jingle 4 photo DSCN7006_zps560c8b2f.jpg

Jingle 5 photo DSCN7014_zps9ad20846.jpg

Jingle 6 photo DSCN6899_zps04ba5038.jpg

Jingle 7 photo DSCN6974_zps964bca07.jpg

Jingle 8 photo DSCN6975_zpsc557e142.jpg

Jingle 9 photo DSCN6976_zpsb2d31b7c.jpg

Jingle 10 photo DSCN6977_zps8151960c.jpg

Jingle 12 photo DSCN6979_zps0eb430af.jpg

Jingle 13 photo DSCN6980_zps01c5b88c.jpg

Jingle 14 photo DSCN6983_zps2b32c986.jpg

Jingle 15 photo DSCN6986_zps6ba4a4fd.jpg

Jingle 16 photo DSCN6991_zpsa0fba8dc.jpg

Powwow 101: Women’s Fancy Shawl (Photo Diary)

FS 1 photo DSCN7056_zps80bb250f.jpg

The powwow is a public celebration and demonstration of community pride in Indian culture and a way of honoring Native American heritage. At the present time, there are powwows held in all fifty states and in most of the Canadian provinces. Some are held on reservations and reserves, while others are held in places such as universities and colleges. One of the most popular dances to watch is the women’s fancy shawl dance. This is a colorful, high-stepping dance. Many years ago, when I was still dancing, one fancy shawl dancer explained it this way:

“The idea is to spend as little time touching the ground as possible.”

Watching the women’s fancy shawl competition is like watching a psychedelic blur of color moving in time to the beat of the drum. Shown below are some of the women’s fancy shawl dancers at the 45th annual Kyi-Yo powwow at the University of Montana in Missoula.

FS 22 photo DSCN7044_zps5f0533c1.jpg

FS 23 photo DSCN7048_zps5338f835.jpg

FS 10 photo DSCN6919_zps20157d61.jpg

FS 11 photo DSCN6920_zps17278f61.jpg

FS 12 photo DSCN7018_zps0409be04.jpg

FS 8 photo DSCN6916_zps1ed7fbd3.jpg

FS 7 photo DSCN6910_zps2e736b88.jpg

FS 2 photo DSCN6893_zps2a00a265.jpg

FS 3 photo DSCN6896_zps2ff6c483.jpg

FS 4 photo DSCN6901_zps69801cca.jpg

FS 5 photo DSCN6905_zps8250a415.jpg

FS 6 photo DSCN6907_zps64b445dd.jpg

FS 9 photo DSCN6917_zps60df793f.jpg

FS 13 photo DSCN7019_zps012ca9dd.jpg

FS 14 photo DSCN7022_zps723bdcf2.jpg

FS 15 photo DSCN7026_zpsd090a429.jpg

FS 16 photo DSCN7031_zps86234aa7.jpg

FS 17 photo DSCN7033_zps4658b827.jpg

FS 18 photo DSCN7035_zps7a3dda09.jpg

FS 19 photo DSCN7036_zpsf905500b.jpg

FS 20 photo DSCN7037_zps8c0784f6.jpg

FS 21 photo DSCN7040_zps6bef40ea.jpg

FS 24 photo DSCN7052_zpsa21b6239.jpg

The Kyi-Yo Powwow (Photo Diary)

Powwow 1

Powwow 12

Powwows, a celebration of American Indian identity and culture, are held throughout North America. Powwows are held on reservations as well as off-reservation. A number of powwows are held at universities, often put on by the Native American students. What follows are simply some photographs of the 2011 Kyi-yo powwow held at the University of Montana.

Powwow 3

Powwow 4

Powwow 5

Powwow 6

Powwow 6

Powwow 8

Powwow 9

Powwow 10

Powwow 11

Indians 101: The Powwow

Eagle Staff

It begins with the drums. This is the signal for the dancers to enter into the dance arbor, usually led by dancers carrying the eagle feather staff. This marks the Grand Entry which starts each powwow session. This is a powwow: the most common form of Indian celebration.

The powwow itself is not a religious or spiritual ceremony; nor, in its current form, is it a particularly “ancient” celebration. The powwow is a public celebration and demonstration of community pride in Indian culture and a way of honoring Native American heritage.

Eagle Staff 2

Following the eagle staffs, carried by Fancy Dancers in the powwow shown above, are the flags-American, Canadian, tribal, MIA, state (this varies from powwow to powwow). At many powwows, following the flags are the “royalty” and other dignitaries.

Royalty

The dancers continue to file in-it is not uncommon for a grand entry to take a half an hour-until all dancers have entered the arbor.

Powwow 2009 1

On the other hand, for many people – dancers, drummers, and spectators – the powwow is also a spiritual experience and a spiritual ceremony. Many begin their participation in powwow by smudging: cleansing and spiritually purifying themselves, their dance regalia, and their drums with the smoke from sage or sweetgrass.

Background:

During the Dark Ages of American Indian Religious Freedom (1880 to 1934), the Indian Office (the current Bureau of Indian Affairs) and the local Indian agents discouraged all types of Indian dancing as barriers to civilization. Christian missionaries to the reservations often complained that Indian dances “inflamed animal passions and the immoral and uncivilized people.” Indian agents were told by the Commissioner of Indian Affairs to prohibit Indian dancing as such activities were deemed to be injurious to the moral welfare of the Indians.

The Baptist field matron for the Kiowa-Commanche Reservation in Oklahoma condemned powwow dancing in 1915:

“These dances are one of the breeding places of illegitimate children, which is becoming the shame of the tribe.”

The new superintendent for the Fort Peck Reservation in Montana addressed his concerns over Indian dances in 1917 by stating:

“I recommend the policy of repression and at the same time instruction to show the uselessness of these practices.”

On the other hand, non-Indian tourists had an interest in seeing the Indians dance. While Indian dancing was discouraged on the reservation, non-Indian groups often invited Indians to put on dances in off-reservation venues as a part of celebrations intended to attract tourists.

In 1911, for example, Colorado Springs, Colorado invited a group of Ute to be a part of an exhibition at an 8-day carnival. The Indians performed dances and other ceremonies that were discouraged at their reservation. The events, while not favored by the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, were popular with those attending the event.

In spite of attempts to eradicate Indian dances, the dances continued. In the off-reservation venues, the dancers would often be from different tribes and thus a kind of pan-Indianism developed in which the powwowsa were not a celebration of one particular Indian culture, but of Indianness in general.

FVCC 2009

Contemporary Powwows:

At the present time, there are powwows held in all fifty states and in most of the Canadian provinces. Some are held on reservations and reserves, while others are held in places such as universities and colleges. Some powwows are held in conjunction with tribal casinos.

People dance at powwows for many reasons. Some dance because they are Indian and this is a way of celebrating their heritage. Powwows are a time for renewing friendships, for seeing family and friends, for coming home.

Some dance because they earn money in the contests. Many large powwows run dance contests and some dancers travel a powwow circuit, dancing at different powwows each weekend, and earning enough money through their winnings to stay on the road.

Some dance because of their personal spiritual beliefs and vision. It is not uncommon for Indians in the process of recovery from alcoholism and/or drug addiction to dance as a way of spiritually reinforcing their sobriety.

FVCC 2009 2

Grand Entry

Trad Dancer 1

The Powwow

( – promoted by navajo)

The most common form of Indian ceremony is the powwow. The powwow itself is not a religious or spiritual ceremony; nor, in its current form, is it a particularly “ancient” celebration. The powwow is a public celebration and demonstration of community pride in Indian culture and a way of honoring Native American heritage.

Powwow 2009 1

On the other hand, for many people – dancers, drummers, and spectators – the powwow is also a spiritual experience and a spiritual ceremony. Many begin their participation in powwow by smudging: cleansing and spiritually purifying themselves, their dance regalia, and their drums with the smoke from sage or sweetgrass.

Background:

During the Dark Ages of American Indian Religious Freedom (1880 to 1934), the Indian Office (the current Bureau of Indian Affairs) and the local Indian agents discouraged all types of Indian dancing as barriers to civilization. Christian missionaries to the reservations often complained that Indian dances “inflamed animal passions and the immoral and uncivilized people.” Indian agents were told by the Commissioner of Indian Affairs to prohibit Indian dancing as such activities were deemed to be injurious to the moral welfare of the Indians.

The Baptist field matron for the Kiowa-Commanche Reservation in Oklahoma condemned powwow dancing in 1915:

“These dances are one of the breeding places of illegitimate children, which is becoming the shame of the tribe.”

The new superintendent for the Fort Peck Reservation in Montana addressed his concerns over Indian dances in 1917 by stating:

“I recommend the policy of repression and at the same time instruction to show the uselessness of these practices.”

On the other hand, non-Indian tourists had an interest in seeing the Indians dance. While Indian dancing was discouraged on the reservation, non-Indian groups often invited Indians to put on dances in off-reservation venues as a part of celebrations intended to attract tourists.

In 1911, for example, Colorado Springs, Colorado invited a group of Ute to be a part of an exhibition at an 8-day carnival. The Indians performed dances and other ceremonies that were discouraged at their reservation. The events, while not favored by the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, were popular with those attending the event.

In spite of attempts to eradicate Indian dances, the dances continued. In the off-reservation venues, the dancers would often be from different tribes and thus a kind of pan-Indianism developed in which the powwowsa were not a celebration of one particular Indian culture, but of Indianness in general.

FVCC 2009

Contemporary Powwows:

At the present time, there are powwows held in all fifty states and in most of the Canadian provinces. Some are held on reservations and reserves, while others are held in places such as universities and colleges. Some powwows are held in conjunction with tribal casinos.

People dance at powwows for many reasons. Some dance because they are Indian and this is a way of celebrating their heritage. Powwows are a time for renewing friendships, for seeing family and friends, for coming home.

Some dance because they earn money in the contests. Many large powwows run dance contests and some dancers travel a powwow circuit, dancing at different powwows each weekend, and earning enough money through their winnings to stay on the road.

Some dance because of their personal spiritual beliefs and vision. It is not uncommon for Indians in the process of recovery from alcoholism and/or drug addiction to dance as a way of spiritually reinforcing their sobriety.

FVCC 2009 2

Grand Entry:

Grand Entry

Traditional Dancer:

Trad Dancer 1

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged