Pe Sla in Black Hills to be “Sea of Houses” (UPDATE)

(This is a repost from years ago, and now the nightmare is coming true. When the thieves are in their “Heaven” with their streets made of gold, some of that gold will have been ripped from the sacred Black Hills. I won’t be there)

Update:



http://64.38.12.138/News/2012/…

RAPID CITY, SOUTH DAKOTA — Yet another federally funded “improvement” project threatens to further undermine the sanctity and integrity of a culturally relevant Native American landmark in the Black Hills, or Paha Sapa.

The Pennington County-initiated undertaking, known as the South Rochford Road Project, seeks to pave an approximately 12-mile graveled stretch of road between the unincorporated town of Rochford and Deerfield Lake, a recreational destination. This particular section of South Rochford Road, which remains as a historical throwback of Rochford’s gold mining boomtown days of the late 19th century, gouges a swath directly through the center of what the Lakota call “Pe Sla,” or the venerated “Old Baldy” of the Black Hills.

– snip –

Due to the nation’s ensuing recession, however, the project was essentially put on the back burner until 2010, when the economy began its slow recovery. At that time, the Federal Highway Administration determined that an environmental impact statement (EIS) was necessary before the proposal could continue.



Consolidated Indigenous Shadow Report. p. 34.

…the continuation and preservation of traditional Native American Religion is ensured only through the performance of ceremonies and rites by tribal members. These ceremonies and rites are often performed on specific sites…These sites may also be based on special geographic features…For most Native American religions, there may be no alternative places of worship since these ceremonies must be performed at certain places and times to be effective.

Such is the case at Pe Sla, “one of the five primary sacred sites in the Black Hills to the Lakota nation.”

Source

The Pe Sla is one of the five primary sacred sites in the Black Hills to the Lakota nation because of its position on their annual pilgrimage/journey of prayers and ceremonies.  It is also the only one held mostly in private hands as others are within state or federal property.  This prairie has only known cattle grazing by a handful of ranchers since the Homestead Act.  Now subdivisions are encroaching upon this one pristine open space left in the Black Hills.

I can not speak for any tribe and here is my opinion. I think the ACLU should be seriously considered in terms of asking them to sue the appropriate parties over suffocating the religious freedom of the Lakota Nation to start with. I’m “seeking a way to protect this place,” so I didn’t mention cultural genocide.

(emphasis and underline mine)

Source

When the Forest Service was asked about a cabin being renovated as a memorial to the ranching history on the Pe Sla, the questioners reminded them that there was a much longer history of this site among the Lakota.  The Forest Service representative told us that the Lakota elders with whom they consult told them no one wanted that information known.  A few months later when an official from the county government was standing on Rochford Road that runs through the middle of the Pe Sla or Reynolds Prairie, he exclaimed with great satisfaction that “soon this road will be a black ribbon (paved with asphalt) and this prairie will be a sea of houses”.
 Unfortunately, it is only a matter of time that further abuse and possible desecration will take place so that we must tell the story of this sacred site.  Action must be taken to preserve this prairie for future generations.  

• Please pray for its preservation and for the awareness of its spiritual significance to all people.  

• Please tell the story to all whom you know.  

Please show your support by seeking ways to protect this place.  Some of those possibilities are outlined below.

Furthermore, I think Joe Garcia, President of the NCAI, should be contacted by the ACLU in order to proceed in the manner which would not damage tribal sovereignty in any fashion what-so-ever.


NCAI

National Congress of American Indians (NCAI)

1301 Connecticut Ave NW, Suite 200, Washington D.C. 20036

Phone: (202) 466-7767, Fax: (202) 466-7797

Email: ncai@ncai.org

The ACLU could do a fund and membership drive revolving around this, which would hopefully increase their membership and help raise finances for the case. Everything considered, what are the other alternatives?


Source

The Pennington County Highway Department held a meeting regarding the reconstruction of South Rochford Road at Hill City, SD, on Monday, March 3, 2008, at 6:30 pm. This project runs from Deerfield Lake to the village of Rochford passing through the middle of Reynolds Prairie, or the Pe Sla, one of the most important and sacred Lakota annual pilgrimage sites. Currently it is a gravel road but the plans are to asphalt eleven (11) miles of road with $7.5 million dollars. If the road is blacktopped, housing development and increased traffic will occur. The Hill City Chamber of Commerce is pushing this project.

If they were considering condemning hundreds of churches for the sake of “development” or uranium for that matter, we wouldn’t even be having this discussion.  

Custer’s Pipeline Rides Again

“Wonderful U.S. and Canada!”

Tommywommy's Friend


Obama supports TransCanada’s bid to push ahead with part of oil pipeline

(Edited from an earlier version in 2008. Since it’s original publishing, the US signed the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. However, that was just smoke and mirrors, so I left the original intact)

A Canadian company has the legal right to condemn land for a crude-oil pipeline through the eastern part of the state (South Dakota in this case) –

Custer’s method of attack was a four front attack at dawn on sleeping villages. It seems an extreme comparison to make, even irresponsible. Is it however, since George W. Bush and the Neoconservative forces in the U.S. and in Canada who de-affirmed the U.N. Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples are going to finish what Custer started in the sacred Black Hills? Custer discovered gold there and that brought the railroad along with cultural destruction in the very least. Today, uranium has been being drilled for, and more cultural destruction will probably tragically come about as the result of the TransCanada Keystone Project. But wait, that’s not the only problem.

Considering the degrees of difference between the mid – 1860’s and now in regards to Native Population, language loss, cultural loss (many ceremonies were lost, for example), and that Custer was responsible for a great deal of the loss – I consider this to be Custer’s Pipeline.


“Judge denies Stay”

“Drilling to continue”

Powertech, a Canadian mining company, began drilling uranium exploratory wells in the Dewey Burdock area northwest of Edgemont a few weeks despite the approval of their permit being appealed in court.


Black Hills Announces Additional Texas Pipeline Acquisition

Rapid City, SD – Black Hills Energy, Inc., the integrated energy subsidiary of Black Hills Corporation today announced the purchase of the assets of the Kilgore to Houston Pipeline System from Equilon Pipeline Company, LLC. The pipeline will be operated by the Company’s Houston-based oil pipeline and transportation company, Black Hills Operating Company, LLC, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Black Hills Energy Resources, Inc.

The Kilgore pipeline transports crude oil from the Kilgore, TX region south to Houston, TX, which is the transfer point to connecting carriers via the Oiltanking Houston terminal facilities. The 10-inch pipeline is approximately 190 miles long and has a capacity of approximately 35,000 barrels per day for sweet and 23,000 barrels per day for sour type crude oil. In addition, the Kilgore system has approximately 400,000 barrels of crude oil storage at Kilgore and 375,000 barrels of storage at the Texoma Tank Farm located in Longview, TX. These storage facilities will eventually be interchangeable between the two tank farms.

I’ve mentioned before that Custer was a rapist, the pipeline will be yet more rape of the Earth Mother.

Project OVERVIEW

The Keystone Oil Pipeline (Keystone) is a proposed 2,969 kilometre (1,845 mile) pipeline with an initial nominal capacity to transport approximately 435,000 barrels per day of crude oil from Hardisty, Alberta, to U.S. Midwest markets at Wood River and Patoka, Illinois.

– snip –

The commercial commitments support the expansion of the Keystone Pipeline to a nominal capacity of approximately 590,000 barrels per day and will involve the construction of a 473-kilometre (294-mile) extension of the U.S. portion of the pipeline from the Nebraska/Kansas border to a hub near Cushing, Oklahoma. The expansion and extension target in-service date is fourth quarter 2010.
 

The total length of the proposed Keystone Pipeline is 1,845 miles (2,969 kilometres).

o Approximately 1,078 miles (1,735 kilometres) of new pipeline will be constructed in the U.S.

o The Canadian portion of the proposed project includes the construction of approximately 230 miles (370 kilometres) of new pipeline and the conversion of approximately 537 miles (864 kilometres) of existing TransCanada pipeline from natural gas to crude oil transmission.

o


To conclude, Custer’s dawn attacks upon sleeping villages were for the element of surprise. I think it’s fair to say that stealing land and attempts at steal land is now expected; however, the “element of surprise” has been replaced by historical trauma,


Native Americans suffer from ‘historical trauma,’ researcher says

REDLANDS, Calif. (UMNS) – The treatment given to American Indians as the United States pushed its boundaries westward has resulted in an ongoing emotional condition that a Native American social worker-researcher calls “historical trauma.”

The “element of surprise” has also been replaced by violence and rape on reservations. How can all of or even most of the people who remain defend their way of life and their culture effectively, while being in the grips of historical trauma, rape, violence and teen suicides?


Domestic violence a problem on Montana reservations

Women’s advocates in Montana say violence against Native women is an everyday occurrence on the state’s reservations.

Nonetheless, they continue to strive on.


Source

(Custer, South Dakota) – While some South Dakota whites will always be bitter about the Wounded Knee standoff over three decades ago, a Native American national newspaper reporter says a recent benefit concert was a step toward healing race relations while raising money to fight an alarming increase in domestic violence and teen suicide on the Lakota Rosebud Reservation.


Source

Teen suicide is two to three times higher among American Indian and Native Alaskan youths than among other ethnic groups and the general population. People in Indian Country recognize the numbers, Flatt said.

Very last of all, is that genocide denial helps to keep the help so desperately needed away in the appropriate forms that have been requested time and time again by leaders of the tribes. George W. Bush and the Neoconservative forces in the U.S. and in Canada who de-affirmed the U.N. Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples have now all but said that these American Indians aren’t human beings.

Genocide denial is much more common than realized.

Reject the Lie of White “Genocide” Against Native Americans

Funny thing, all my life I thought I was a human being in the eyes of everyone –


Pilgrims Pilloried in streets of Plymouth

Hitler wasn’t stopped by the Apaches but by the armies of that country whose conception the Plymouth protesters mourn.

The activists were outraged by my description of the Indians as primitives with a Stone Age culture that had neither a written language, metallurgy nor the wheel.

Reality is awfully insensitive. Still, it’s important to recall that Native Americans did not build great canoes and cross the Big Water to discover Europe.

Theodore Roosevelt spent several years ranching in the Dakotas while there was still a frontier. In “The Winning of the West,” Roosevelt wrote: “Not only were the Indians very terrible in battle, but they were cruel beyond all belief in victory; and the gloomy annals of border warfare are stained with their darkest hues because it was a war in which helpless women and children suffered the same hideous fate that so often befell their husbands and fathers.”

Apparently not.

But then again, genocide denial is part of the steel that drills the oil in “Custer’s Pipeline.”


John (Fire) Lame Deer And Richard Erdoes. “Lame Deer, Seeker of Visions.” p.96.

There’s a little Custer in all those sightseers, souvenir hunters, rock hounds, tourist scalpers, sharps and Deadwood hookers which cover these hills (Black Hills) like so many ants.

I couldn’t agree more with theNative American Rights Fund, “The Indian Wars never ended.”

Custer and his 7th Calvary may not be on horseback approaching unsuspecting villages, but it could be said that they’ve gone from horseback to the modern day “Battlefield,” the courtroom. The urgent thing to know is, Custer is winning, metaphorically speaking.


Historic meeting ends on pessimistic note

Determining the pipeline’s effects on cultural places appeared to have been a cursory and simplistic process.

Longtime efforts by preservation professionals to protect the more ineffable indigenous sites – vision quest places, pilgrimage trails, natural resources critical to a craft, habitats of culturally important animals and even places with no material manifestations at all – were disregarded.

At one point, an Entrix consultant offered to give Native people $400 per day to walk alongside the machinery during construction; however, the job came without authority to stop work if a site was struck.

In addition to what I’ve already cited:

The Northern Cheyenne have serious concerns about land encroachment

Cattle has been stolen off of Indian land as recent as 2002.

In February of this year (2007), “representative Joseph J. Suhrada (R) simply stated that “They [the county] want to get rid of the Indians”.

(Emphasis mine)

FRONTLINE #1705 Air Date: October 6, 1998

ARCHIE HOFFMAN: I guess he did check into the Fort Reno property and found out about all that gas and oil under Fort Reno. So he seen money there, about $50 million. He wanted us to sign a contract giving him 10 percent of that, and he’d get that property back for us. And he said, but if we didn’t do that, he said he’d make sure we never got that property back, you know?

BILL MOYERS: “They want the land given back to them on a platter,” Landow told FRONTLINE when he refused an on-camera interview. “They brought in innocent people like me. They’re a bunch of goddamn uneducated Indians.”

I could go on and on, but isn’t this the basic deplorable negative attitude beneath all this?

‘Oz’ author called for genocide of the Lakota

Six days after the massacre, while the frozen bodies of the Lakota men, women and children were being dumped into a mass grave, L. Frank Baum, the editor of a weekly newspaper in Aberdeen, SD, wrote an editorial calling for the annihilation of any Lakota still alive.

His editorial read in part, “Having wronged them once perhaps we should wrong them again and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.”

I’ll reiterate and finish this.

Genocide denial is part of the steel that drills the oil in “Custer’s Pipeline,” is part of what moves the pens making lying papers that are stealing and have stolen the promised sovereignty of American Indians, and what makes the modern day Custers feel joy when they succeed and rage when they fail.

Professor of Philosophy Henry Theriault Discusses Comparative Dimension of Genocide Denial

Nevertheless, denial of the genocide of Native Americans is still very strong. It works primarily through omission; people just refuse to talk about the issue. There was a strong backlash to newspaper editorials urging free discussion of this topic, which were published in 1992, the fifth centenary of the European discovery of the Americas. That denial has continued in the past decade, and deniers try to explain the extermination of the Native Americans as just an unfortunate event.

Even when Native Americans sue the government to reclaim their lands on violated treaty grounds, the courts usually throw these cases out. Moreover, when uranium was discovered in the 20th century in Native American reservations, the US claimed the uranium in the name of national security, without proper compensation.


Historic meeting ends on pessimistic note

Determining the pipeline’s effects on cultural places appeared to have been a cursory and simplistic process. Longtime efforts by preservation professionals to protect the more ineffable indigenous sites – vision quest places, pilgrimage trails, natural resources critical to a craft, habitats of culturally important animals and even places with no material manifestations at all – were disregarded. At one point, an Entrix consultant offered to give Native people $400 per day to walk alongside the machinery during construction; however, the job came without authority to stop work if a site was struck.

Tommywommy's Friend

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The Black HIlls, 1950 to 1985

Following World War II, the United States decided that it wanted to sever its relationships with American Indian tribes. In order to do this, it needed to settle all possible legal claims which might arise out of its past dealings with the tribes. Thus, in 1946, Congress created the Indian Claims Commission to adjudicate all claims arising out of fraud, treaty violations, or other wrongs done to the Indians by the government. Under the Indian Claims Commission Act, a tribe could receive full and just compensation for wrongs. It was presumed that most of these claims would deal with land: lands which had been illegally seized from Indian tribes, land which had been purchased from them at less than their true market value, and damages to Indian land by non-Indian intruders.  

In 1950, the Sioux re-filed their claim for the Black Hills, South Dakota with the Indian Claims Commission. Eight tribes were a party to the case: Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe (South Dakota), Crow Creek Sioux Tribe (South Dakota), Lower Brule Sioux Tribe (South Dakota), Oglala Sioux Tribe of the Pine Ridge Reservation (South Dakota and Nebraska), Rosebud Sioux Tribe (South Dakota) Santee Sioux Tribe (Nebraska), Sioux Tribe of the Fort Peck Reservation (Montana), and Standing Rock Sioux Tribe (North Dakota and South Dakota).

Two years later, oral arguments were held regarding the Sioux Black Hills claim before the Indian Claims Commission. The attorney for the Sioux argued that the United States violated its trust obligations as guardian of the Sioux tribes when it acquired the Black Hills.

In 1954, the Indian Claims Commission rejected the Sioux claim on the Black Hills as the Commission did not feel that the United States had acted dishonorably. The Commission felt that

“it was a practical necessity that the lands be acquired by the defendant and made available to white miners.”

The Commission felt that the United States had not only tried its best to keep miners out of the Black Hills, but in addition Congress had generously appropriated funds to support the Sioux even after federal obligation to provide rations had expired. The Commission was either unaware or purposely ignored that fact that President Ulysses S. Grant had ordered the military to make no attempt to deter the miners from entering the Black Hills in 1875.

While the Sioux felt that the findings of the Indian Claims Commission were not correct, in 1956 the Court of Claims affirmed the Indian Claims Commission rejection of the Sioux claims. However, the following year, the Court of Claims vacated prior proceedings in the Sioux Black Hills claim. According to the Court, the claim had been decided on a distorted record in which the attorney for the tribes had made concessions contrary to fact and had failed to conduct significant research in the case.

In 1958, the Court of Claims ordered the Indian Claims Commission to reopen the Sioux claim for the Black Hills on the grounds that the Sioux had been inadequately represented and as a consequence an inadequate record had been presented.

In 1960, the Court of Claims allowed the Sioux to amend their original claim and to substitute two separate petitions: (1) a claim for lands outside of western South Dakota which were ceded under the 1868 Fort Laramie Treaty, and (2) a claim for property confiscated by Congress (the Black Hills). The Black Hills claim included claims for the land, the hunting rights, the placer gold which was removed, and three rights-of-way.

In 1974, the Indian Claims Commission awarded the Sioux $17.5 million for the Black Hills. The opinion of the Commission was that the Black Hills had been taken in violation of the Fifth Amendment and therefore the Sioux were entitled to just compensation. In addition, the Commission awarded the tribes compensation for placer gold which was removed and for the loss of rights-of-way. The total award was $105 million. The finding of the Indian Claims Commission was appealed by the United States.

In 1980, the Supreme Court in United States v. Sioux Nation of Indians affirmed the Court of Claims ruling and awarded the Sioux $106 million for the Black Hills. The monetary award was for the value of the land and minerals at the time of taking in 1877 plus interest. In the decision which clearly ruled that the lands had been taken illegally, Justice Blackmun wrote:

“A more ripe and rank case of illegal dealing will never, in all probability, be found in our history.”

In his dissent, Justice Rehnquist did not even bother to conceal his personal anti-Indian racism with legal arguments and wrote:

“the Indians did not lack their share of villainy either.”

Following the Supreme Court decision, the Court of Claims determined that the only issue remaining on the Sioux land claims for lands ceded in the 1868 Fort Laramie Treaty was the offsets to be allowed.  The government offered to settle the case for $4.2 million in offset costs but the tribes rejected the offer and demanded the return of all federal lands in the area.

In 1980, Mario Gonzalez, the tribal attorney for the Oglala Sioux Tribe, filed suit in U.S. District Court asking for recognition of Sioux title to the Black Hills and $11 billion in damages for denial of the tribe’s use and occupancy of the area. Gonzalez contended that the government had taken the land for the purpose of securing private mining claims rather than for the general public. The District Court dismissed the case claiming that it lacks jurisdiction. The tribe appealed, but also lost the appeal.

The Sioux did not want money for the Black Hills: they wanted this sacred land returned to them. They refused to take the money which had been awarded in their case and in 1982 the Committee for the Return of the Black Hills was formed. The Committee had one representative from each of the Sioux tribes who had been involved in the suit.

In 1985, Senator Bill Bradley (Democrat, New Jersey) introduced a bill in the U.S. Senate which would return the federally owned land in the Black Hills in South Dakota to the Sioux. Under his proposed bill, private ranches and businesses as well as Mount Rushmore would remain untouched. The bill was opposed by non-Indians in South Dakota and was defeated in 1987.

The Open Hills Association was formed by Senator Tom Dashle (Democrat, South Dakota) in 1990. The new association was dedicated to fighting all attempts by the Sioux to regain the Black Hills.

The reparation payment is currently being held in trust for the Sioux tribes. With interest it has grown to nearly $600 million. A large majority of Sioux tribal members, in spite of the poverty that is found on most of their reservations, continue to affirm that the Black Hills are not for sale and support attempts to regain the sacred area.

Mount Rushmore

While Europeans tended to build the places they considered to be sacred-churches, statues, memorials-for American Indian people sacred places were often not places constructed by humans, but places which were naturally sacred. In looking at the landscape around them, Indian people did not see a landscape that needed changing, nor did they see it as a landscape which they were to dominate: rather, they saw a landscape filled with living things. The living things within this landscape included the plants and animals, as well as the rivers, the rocks, the mountains, and the hills. Sacred places in the landscape were often portals through which Indian people could make contact with the sacred.

The Black Hills in South Dakota is an area which is historically linked to several tribes, including the Sioux, Cheyenne, Arapaho, and Kiowa. As a sacred area, it was used for making contact with the spirit world and obtaining spiritual power. It was here that many Indians conducted ceremonies such as the vision quest, the Sun Dance, and others. It was here that they gathered the sacred medicines-the plants-that they needed for healing and for ceremonial use.

By the 1870s, Americans were spreading rumors that that Black Hills were unoccupied, that they were an area which Indian people did not use. Illegal expeditions into the area somehow ignored all of the Indian hunting parties which they encountered, and which were reported in their journals, and told of an empty area waiting for “development” by non-Indians who would redeem the area from its paganism and make it a part of modern America.

The theft of the Black Hills from the Sioux has been widely reported by both historians and the popular media. The theft, however, involved more than just taking the land: it also involved renaming it. All of the geographic features within the Black Hills had Indian names in 1877, but over the next couple of decades these names were replaced by non-Indian names.

In 1884, New York City attorney Charles E. Rushmore came to the Black Hills to check on legal titles to some properties. On coming back to camp one day, he asked Bill Challis about the name of a mountain. Bill is reported to have replied:

“Never had a name but from now on we’ll call it Rushmore.”

With that offhand comment, the mountain known to the Sioux as Six Grandfathers became Mount Rushmore. The Sioux name had been an important part of their oral tradition and their association with the land. The new name reflected the American lack of concern for the history of the land and the importance of attorneys in their society.

The wealth generated from the gold and the cattle in the Black Hills was not enough to satisfy American greed. By the 1920s, people were looking for new ways of exploiting the Black Hills. In other parts of the country, tourism was proving to be an economic asset, and so, in 1923, Doane Robinson, the South Dakota state historian, came up with an idea to bring tourists (and their money) into the state. His idea was to commission a sculptor to transform one of the tall narrow, granite rock formations in the Black Hills into memorials of major figures from the mythic narrative of the American west. In his vision, he saw giant memorials to heroes such as George Armstrong Custer, Meriwether Lewis, William Clark, and perhaps the Sioux chief Red Cloud, which would stand along a new highway and lure tourists away from Yellowstone National Park.

The next problem was how to bring the vision into reality. To solve this, Robinson turned to Gutzon Borglum, the son of Danish Mormon immigrants who had made the ten-week trek along the Mormon trail through Indian lands to Salt Lake City. Borglum was one of the most famous sculptors of the time. Borglum had been involved with the carving of a massive bas-relief monument to the heroes of the Confederacy at Stone Mountain, Georgia. Borglum was a member of the Ku Klux Klan and Stone Mountain was used as a site to revitalize the Klan.

Robinson had initially envisioned the carvings on a series of geological features known as “The Needles,” but Borglum found them unsuitable for carving and selected the Six Grandfathers (Mount Rushmore) instead. The new plan was assailed by naturalists who pointed out that it would desecrate the natural beauty of the Black Hills. Robinson replied:

“God only makes a Michelangelo or a Gutzon Borglum once in a thousand years.”

Borglum changed the original vision of the project and proposed a “Shrine of Democracy” which would focus on Presidential portraits. He would later state:

“The purpose of the memorial is to communicate the founding, expansion, preservation, and unification of the United States with colossal statues of Washington, Jefferson, Lincoln, and Theodore Roosevelt.”

In 1926, Borglum began carving the faces of four presidents out of a mountain in the Black Hills, land sacred to the Lakota people. The sculptor, who admired Manifest Destiny and saw the conquest of the Lakota and the theft of their sacred land as justifiable, dedicated the sculptures to the Expansion of the United States. From Borglum’s perspective, Manifest Destiny, an expression of racial superiority, was an expression of the rightful order of the world.

Mt Rushmore 2

The following year, President Calvin Coolidge dedicated the construction of the monument to Presidents George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, and Theodore Roosevelt.  While the Black Hills were sacred to the Sioux and other tribes, Coolidge made no mention of Indians in his dedication speech.

In 1936, President Franklin Roosevelt dedicated the nearly completed monument to Presidents George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, and Theodore Roosevelt at Mount Rushmore. As with the earlier Presidential dedication, the President made no mention of Indians. The general public who read about the new monument, and the tourists who came to it, were oblivious to the fact that Mount Rushmore had once been Indian land, and that it was still sacred to them.

Mt Rushmore 1

From the Indian perspective, the monument at Mount Rushmore was a symbol of the dominant culture’s arrogance, racism, and spiritual insensitivity. Carving icons of Presidents who were known for their insensitivity to Indian issues into a living sacred mountain would be similar to painting anti-Christian graffiti inside of cathedral, or anti-Semitic symbols inside a synagogue.

In 1970, a group of about 20 Sioux from the Pine Ridge Reservation under the leadership of Leo Wilcox, a tribal council member, asked to conduct a prayer vigil at the amphitheater at Mount Rushmore. The request was granted. The group explained to tourists and the news media that they had come to protest the failure of the United States to return land taken from the Pine Ridge Reservation for a gunnery range during World War II. They pointed out that Mount Rushmore, a part of the Black Hills, had been illegally taken from them a century earlier.

In a separate demonstration, members of the American Indian Movement demonstrated at Mount Rushmore.  Several of them camped on the top of the monument just behind the head of Theodore Roosevelt. A highly respected Sioux spiritual leader, Frank Fools Crow, came to Mount Rushmore and performed a ceremony to purify the land. In doing this ceremony, he re-established the Sioux religious relationship with Mount Rushmore.

In 1971, the American Indian Movement symbolically renamed the monument Mount Crazy Horse. Sioux spiritual leader John Fire Lame Deer planted a prayer staff on top of the mountain. From the viewpoint of AIM and many Native Americans, Mount Rushmore should be considered as the Shrine of Hypocrisy rather than as the Shrine of Democracy. Mount Rushmore symbolizes to them the treaties broken by the United States.

By the end of the twentieth century, there was no doubt that Mount Rushmore was a successful tourist attraction. The non-Indian businesses in the area were earning about $100 million annually. This prosperity was made possible by an initial investment of about $1 million in federal tax money. Just 60 miles east of the monument, however, the Pine Ridge Reservation, home to many of the Sioux who had been the aboriginal owners, was one of the poorest areas in the United States with an unemployment rate of about 80%.

In 2004, Gerard Baker (Mandan/Hidatsa) became the first Native American superintendent of the park. He had previously been superintendent at the Little Bighorn Battlefield in Montana. When he was offered the position at Mount Rushmore, he called the elders and asked their advice. He was expecting them to tell him not to take the job, but instead was told that this would be a good place to start the healing.

Baker 1

Baker 3

Gerard Baker is pictured above.

Under his leadership, Mount Rushmore opened more avenues of interpretation and moved beyond the single focus on the four Presidents. Baker opened up a dialogue with Native American groups, asking them for feedback and input about the monument. As a result, Heritage Village, a small cluster of Sioux tipis, was established at the monument. During the work week, Native Americans provided demonstrations of Sioux culture and handicrafts. They also provided insights into the aboriginal Sioux culture.

In 2008, Baker invited several tribal elders to a tribal council held on the park grounds of Mount Rushmore. In the council the park rangers and staff listened to the concerns and issues of the elders. Three main ideas came out of this dialogue: (1) to place Sioux language translations on several signs as a way of indicating the Indian presence, (2) to distribute pamphlets with an accurate description of Sioux culture and spirituality; and (3) to have Native American college students collect oral histories from elders about the park.

Baker, who suffered a stroke in 2009, retired early from the National Park Service in 2010.

The Fight for the Black Hills, 1910 to 1943

The Black Hills in South Dakota is an area which is sacred to several tribes, including the Sioux, Cheyenne, and Arapaho. Geologically, the Black Hills are the site of an ancient upheaval that pushed the rocky strata far above the surrounding plains. The resulting peaks trapped the clouds and gave the region its own climate. During the summers, this was an area which was often used for ceremonies-sweat lodges, vision quests, and Sun Dances-and for gathering medicinal plants.  

In 1851, the United States, in the Treaty of Fort Laramie, assigned the Black Hills to the Sioux in spite of claims to this area by the Cheyenne and Arapaho. By 1875, there were at least 1,200 American miners in the area in direct violation of the treaty. Instead of following the law and protecting Indian rights, the United States ordered the Sioux to stay away from the region and then engaged in a military campaign against them in an attempt to acquire title to the area. In 1877, the Sioux were forced to relinquish their rights to the Black Hills. The new agreement ignored the provision in the 1868 treaty which required three-fourths of adult Sioux males to sign any land cession agreement. Instead, the chiefs and two head men from each tribe signed. At this time, neither Congress nor the American public was in a mood to be bound by legal technicalities.

By the first part of the twentieth century, the Sioux began a new battle, this time in the American courts, to regain the Black Hills. In 1910, a Sioux delegation from the Standing Rock Reservation in South Dakota travelled to Washington, D.C. where they met with attorney Z. Lewis Dalby to discuss the Black Hills situation. Dalby studied the matter and concluded that a successful claim would be doubtful. In spite of this negative report, the following year the Black Hills Treaty Council was organized on the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation to prepare a suit in the U.S. Court of Claims.

In 1913, Sioux historian Bad Heart Bull (also known as Amos Bad Heart Buffalo and Amos Bad Heart Bull) died at the age of 74. In 1890 he had begun a project of recording tribal history based on what the elders had taught him. The history was done in a pictorial (Winter Count) format and consisted of more than 400 pictures. Among the pictures is a map of the Black Hills which emphasizes its sacred sites.

Fighting to regain the Black Hills in the American legal system costs money. In 1914, the Sioux began to stage “singings” at reservation dance halls as a way of raising money to pay for legal representation and related costs in their fight to regain the Black Hills. The agents on the reservation opposed this fight and therefore responded by prohibiting the “singings.” In addition, the Indian Bureau refused to release any tribal money for pursuing their claim.

In 1917, a traditional Lakota chief, encouraged by the Lakota physician Charles Eastman, requested a council to discuss the Black Hills claim. The superintendent of the Rosebud Reservation recommended that the council be denied as the young men in such a council would not be likely to oppose the opinions of the elders. Consequently the Commissioner of Indian Affairs denied permission for the council.

Finally, in 1920, the Sioux were able to file a claim in the Court of Claims regarding the taking of the Black Hills in South Dakota.

In 1930, a Sioux delegation from the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota, including Iron White Man, George Little Wound, Emil Afraid of Hawk, and Henry Standing Bear, travelled to Washington, D.C. where they met with the Commission of Indian Affairs to discuss their Black Hills Claim.

More than a decade after the case had been filed, the Court of Claims heard oral arguments on the Sioux claim for the Black Hills in 1941. There appears to be no record of this hearing and it is unclear as to whether or not any Sioux tribal leaders were actually present. In 1942, the Court of Claims rejected the Sioux claims for the Black Hills. Legal historians describe Judge Benjamin Littleton’s decision as a “masterpiece of judicial obfuscation.”

As the courts are rejecting the Sioux claims, the misinformation which was being fed to the general public increases. In 1942, Hollywood presented another picture of the Sioux in They Died With Their Boots On, a story of Lt. Col. George Custer’s defeat in the 1876 Battle of the Greasy Grass (Little Bighorn). Not only is Custer elevated to the rank of General, but he is also portrayed as the noble friend of the Indians, a man dedicated to protecting the Black Hills for the Sioux. Crazy Horse, on the other hand, appears to be inarticulate, immature, and perhaps somewhat insane.

In 1943, the Supreme Court refused to review the Court of Claims decision regarding the Sioux claim for the Black Hills. At this point it looked as if the Sioux battle for justice in the American legal system had been defeated.  

The Theft of the Black Hills

During the second half of the nineteenth century, American policies regarding the “civilizing” of the Plains Indians called for them to be segregated in reservations where they could be trained to be Christian farmers. At the same time, non-Indians, obsessed with the idea of obtaining Indian land, strongly felt that because the Indians didn’t know how to farm, the good farm land on the reservations should be opened to non-Indian settlement. In addition, since Indians didn’t value gold, all mineral producing lands should be turned over to non-Indians so that it could be mined. Since it was imperative that Indians become Christians, sacred lands referred only to lands developed as Christian churches, while areas which had been sacred to Indians was simply considered vacant lands which needed to be developed.  

By 1872, American settlers in the Dakotas were complaining loudly about the amount of land locked up in the Sioux Reservation. One newspaper wrote:

“The Indians can make no use of the country which has been set apart for them. The pine lands and mineral deposits are of no value to them, because they neither have the knowledge or inclination to utilize them.”

In 1873, the Dakota Territorial legislature asked the U.S. Congress to approve a survey of the Black Hills which would open this area up to exploitation and settlement. Following this request, General Philip Sheridan received permission from President Ulysses S. Grant and the War Department to build a fort in the Black Hills. Non-Indians assumed that the proposed fort was intended to protect them from the “hostile” Indians, while the Indians viewed this as an invasion of their sacred lands in violation of their treaties with the United States.

In 1874, President Ulysses S. Grant ordered Lt. Col. George Armstrong Custer to lead the 7th Cavalry in an expedition to explore and map the Black Hills. Officially, the purpose of the expedition was to find a suitable location for the fort, but in addition it was to examine the topography, flora, fauna, and geology of the Black Hills. The expedition had 900 men and three Gatling guns.  

In addition to soldiers, Custer brought along some miners to help determine if there was gold in the area, and journalists who could quickly let the public know if there was any hint of gold in the area. When the miners reported that they found gold, the journalists sent out reports that fired imaginations regarding easy wealth. With regard to the gold Custer claimed to have found, Professor Newton Winchell, the geologist from the University of Minnesota who accompanied the expedition, doubted that any gold had actually been found. He claimed that the gold which the miners showed-gold which was worth no more than two dollars-was actually gold which they had brought with them to plant in the area.

Regarding the development of the Black Hills by non-Indians, expedition member James Calhoun wrote:

“For the hives of industry will take the place of dirty wigwams. Civilization will ere long reign supreme and throw heathen barbarism into oblivion; … Christian temples will elevate their lofty spires upwards towards the azure sky while places of heathen mythology will sink to rise no more.”

Concerning Indians in the Black Hills, Custer declared that the

“Black Hills region is not occupied by the Indians and is seldom visited by them. It is used as sort of a back-room to which they may escape after committing depredations.”

Custer

The army, reflecting Custer’s opinions, felt that if the Sioux were allowed to retain the Black Hills, they would use the area for staging raids against American settlers and miners.

With the exaggerated reports of gold, companies quickly formed for an assault on the Black Hills. There was little concern as to whether or not this would be permitted by the government: in the past the discovery of gold on Indian lands had always led to governmental abrogation of any Indian rights.

Not all Americans, however, were in favor of exploiting the gold in the Black Hills. Episcopal bishop William Hare warned of dire consequences. Hare insisted that the expedition into the Black Hills would violate the country’s honor. The bishop was one of a number of prominent people who voiced their opposition to any gold rush that would violate the terms of the Indian treaties.

In 1875, the Army under the command of General George Crook made a reconnaissance of the Black Hills and found at least 1,200 miners in the region. The miners were ordered to leave, but there was no effort to enforce the order. In his official report, Crook states:

“Now, when I visited the Black Hills country and conversed with the miners in regard to vacating, and reminded them that they were violating a treaty stipulation, it was but natural that they should reply that the Indians themselves violated the treaty hundreds of times every summer by predatory incursions, whereby many settlers were utterly ruined, and their families left without means of subsistence, and this by Indians who are fed, clothed, and maintained in utter idleness by the Government they, the settlers, help support.”

Gold in Black Hills

A photograph of gold miners in the Black Hills is shown above

The Commissioner of Indian Affairs appointed a special commission to go to South Dakota to meet with the Sioux and obtain the Black Hills. The commission was headed by Senator William B. Allison of Iowa and was thus known as the Allison Commission. In general, the members of the commission had no qualifications for negotiating land cessions from Indians. The government proposed that either the Indians sell them the Black Hills for $6 million to be paid in 15 annual installments, or to lease the mining rights to the area for $400,000 per year. In their response to the proposal, the Sioux leaders, particularly Red Dog and Red Cloud, insisted that it must provide for the next seven generations of their people. The Allison Commission failed to obtain the Black Hills for the United States.

The American government brought Sioux chiefs Red Cloud and Spotted Tail to Washington, D.C. to discuss the Black Hills. The government hoped to persuade the chiefs to relinquish the Black Hills. When the subject of the Black Hills came up, Red Cloud got upset and explained that he had come to Washington only to lay his grievances before the President, not to discuss the Black Hills. Red Cloud told the Commission of Indian Affairs:

“The white men tell me lies, and I became so troubled I wanted to come to Washington and see the Great Father himself and talk with him. That is why I have come to see you.”

When the Sioux delegation met with President Ulysses S. Grant, they were all dressed in full paint and feathers. The President was somewhat cool to the Indian leaders. While he said he was glad to see them, he would not talk business with them. The Sioux were not pleased with their meeting with the President. In their discussions with the Indian Office, the suggestion was again made that they should consider moving to Oklahoma.

Red Cloud Delegation

The Red Cloud delegation is pictured above.

Although United States law (the treaties with the Sioux) prohibited Euro-American occupa¬tion of the Black Hills in South Dakota, President Ulysses S. Grant, in a secret November meeting with the Secretary of the Interior, the Secretary of War, Lieutenant General Sherman and Brigadier General George Crook, brushed aside any treaty obligations to the Sioux and ordered “no further resistance shall be made to miners going into [the Black Hills].” In December all Sioux nations were ordered onto reservations away from their sacred Black Hills, and away from the gold coveted by the Americans. According to the government, the decision to require the Indians to be on the reservations was made to protect reservation Indians from non-treaty Indians.

The United States declared war on the Sioux in 1876. The Sioux had to relinquish the Black Hills or starve. Congress passed an act which provided:

“hereafter there shall be no appropriation made for the subsistence of the Sioux, unless they first relinquish their rights to the hunting grounds outside the [1868 treaty] reservation, ceded the Black Hills to the United States, and reached some accommodation with the Government that would be calculated to enable them to become self-supporting.”

The United States issued an ultimatum to the Sioux: all of the bands were to report to their agency by January 31, 1876 or be considered hostile. This was an impossible order: Indian bands did not usually move in the winter, and second, word would not necessarily reach the off-reservation groups. The army then launched a three-pronged pacification campaign against the “hostiles” who have refused to come in. While the military campaign met with defeat at the Little Bighorn where Lt. Col. Custer and his men were killed, the relentless army troops attacked Indians-any Indians, not just the Sioux-where ever they could find them on the Northern Plains.  

With regard to public relations and non-Indian propaganda regarding the Black Hills, Colonel Richard Dodge’s 1876 book, The Black Hills, declared that the Black Hills had never been the permanent home for any Indians. He also felt that the Sioux don’t really want the area.

In 1877, the Sioux  met in council with the government to sign an agreement which relinquished the Black Hills to the United States. Among the chiefs attending were Red Cloud, Red Dog, Old-Man-Afraid-of-His-Horse, Young-Man-Afraid-of-His-Horse, Little Wound, and Sitting Bull (Oglala). The speeches made by the chiefs at the signing clearly indicated that they neither understood the terms of the agreement nor that they had any intention of abiding by its terms. The new agreement ignored the provision in the 1868 treaty which required three-fourths of adult Sioux males to sign any land cession agreement. Instead, the chiefs and two head men from each tribe signed. At this time, neither Congress nor the American public was in a mood to be bound by legal technicalities.

The Black Hills Are Not for Sale: The Mural Is Up in Los Angeles. Here’s How It Got There

The text of this post was a collaborative project of navajo and Meteor Blades. All but four of the photos, most of which appear below the squiggle, were taken by navajo.

Invisible Indians

This is the third in a year-long series being posted at Native American Netroots dedicated to revealing how American Indians – on reservations and in urban environments – are mostly invisible, a product of long-standing U.S. policy and societal ignorance.

On Nov. 26, 2011, Harper’s magazine Contributing Editor and National Geographic photographer Aaron Huey joined Shepard Fairey, the prolific street artist known to most people for his iconic Obama HOPE campaign image, and installed a stunning 20×80-foot mural THE BLACK HILLS ARE NOT FOR SALE. It’s at the intersection of Ogden and the highly trafficked Melrose Avenue in West Los Angeles near Fairfax.

The result is a beautiful, intriguing “billboard” that we hope will spur those who walk and drive by to educate themselves about what it means. The composition brings visibility to a group that is otherwise pretty much hidden from the rest of the nation, the Lakota people of South Dakota.

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HISTORY AND BACKGROUND:

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The Black Hills (He Sapa in Lakota, the language of the people most Americans know as Sioux) were wrenched from the tribes in 1877. Starting in 1922, the Lakota have sought what has become an 89-year-long array of complex legal efforts to have them returned, so far without success.

In 1950, the Sioux Nation filed a petition with the Indian Claims Commission for He Sapa and other lands based on two factors: treaty violations and lack of compensation. Thirty years later, ruling in what is one of the longest running court cases in U.S. history, United States v. Sioux Nation of Indians, the Supreme Court ruled that the Lakotas had been unjustly moved onto reservations and 7 million acres of their lands, including the He Sapa, illegally opened up to prospectors and homesteaders in violation of the Fort Laramie Treaty of 1868. Rather than give the Black Hills back, the court affirmed a lower court decision backing the ICC’s award of $106 million in compensation, which included 103 years of compound interest. It did not include compensation for the vast amount of minerals that have been extracted from the area.

The Sioux Tribal Council said no to the settlement, fearing that agreeing to take the money would mean they could never get back the sacred He Sapa. Thus the slogan, “The Black Hills are not for sale.” In the 30 years since then, the compensation fund held by the government has grown to more than $1 billion, and the pressure inside the Sioux Nation to accept payment has grown in great part because of the continuing poverty and associated ills the Lakota people endure decade after decade. This past August, a case brought by 19 Lakotas seeking to have the money divided equally among individuals was dismissed by a federal court to the relief of tribal leaders.

Considerable hope has been placed in President Obama to resolve the issue. Unlike past presidents, he is widely viewed among Indians to have actually listened to our concerns and promised to deal with them fairly. Since the highest court has made its ruling, only the President and Congress can change things.

Some solutions have been suggested with varying degrees of acceptance among Lakotas. One proposal would release the accumulated funds from the court-ordered settlement and turn over the federally owned land in the Black Hills and other nearby lands. Excepted would be Mt. Rushmore, which hosts the granite faces of four presidents who presided over the taking of Indian land from coast to coast. No private land owned by non-Lakotas would be part of the deal.

In 2009 the Great Plains Tribal Chairmen’s Association formed the Great Sioux Nation He Sapa Reparation Alliance in hopes of presenting a unified voice for realizing a settlement that would hold the United States responsible for the violations of the 1868 Fort Laramie Treaty and take action on both the land and compensation issues. Nearly 135 years after the Black Hills were taken, the Lakota people still want them back and seem determined not to sell them, not even for a billion dollars.

Here’s a video of Aaron Huey’s TED talk on the Lakota people and the broken treaties:

Transcript of Aaron’s talk and a timeline of treaties made, treaties broken and massacres disguised as battles.

Excerpt:

I have been asked to talk about my relationship with the Lakota. That is a very difficult thing for me because, if you haven’t noticed from my skin color, I’m white. And that will always be a huge barrier on a native reservation. You will see a lot of people in my photographs today. I’ve become very close with them. They have welcomed me like family. They called me “uncle: and “brother” and they welcomed me back many times over in my five years of visits. But on Pine Ridge I will always be what is called Wasi’chu. Wasi’chu is a Lakota word that means “non-Indian,” but another version of this word means “Takes the best part of the meat.” And that is what I want to focus on today: “The one who takes the best part of the meat.” It means “greedy.”

Aaron has been photographing his friends on Pine Ridge since 2004. His goal now is to bring much-needed attention to the Lakota and the history of broken treaties with the U.S. government at Honor The Treaties.org

Ojibwa has more history on American Lies and the Treaty of Fort Laramie

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THE INSTALLATION:

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Meet Miguel Garcia, in the center, with Shepard Fairey on the left and Aaron Huey on the right, Miguel is owner of De La Barracuda, a boxing club at 7769 Melrose. Miguel donated the wall for this installation. The prominent space normally rents for $15,000-20,000.

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We arrive after an 85 mph trip from San Francisco at midday and the work is well under way. They started at 11 a.m. This is Shep walking briskly along the wall, directing the volunteer installers.

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Volunteers have pasted all that can be done at ground level and are now boarding the scissors truck to reach higher spots.

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They have gone through many buckets of wheat paste by the time we arrive.

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Shep scoops up excess wheat paste.

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Shep swabs the installed paper pieces with a thick coat of wheat paste.

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Daryl Hannah and Aaron, who met her at the MountainFilm Festival in Telluride, Colorado this past May. She is now an avid supporter of his Honor the Treaties: Pine Ridge Billboard Project.

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Daryl cuts paper snippets of the image to correct imperfections in the pasting. She was on site for several hours.

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Aaron plots logistics with Shep.

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Daryl and Chet Hay (Aaron’s assistant) join Aaron and Shep to discuss some details of the installation.  

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Chet keeps the mural pieces organized.

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Lakota pow-wow dancer’s ear is hoisted for installation.

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This is Sinuhé Xavier. He knows Miguel, the club owner, and after he met Aaron, he connected the two.

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A large portion of the beautiful Lakota pow-wow dancer’s face is being installed by Shep and other members of the team.  

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Aaron stacks paper strips for the next upload.

Shots taken by co-author Meteor Blades:

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This figure with the outstretched arms is co-author navajo showing how extremely happy she is to be there.

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Shep, Aaron, Meteor Blades, Shockwave and Lara. Honorary SFKossacks Represent!

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Shep, navajo and Aaron.

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Shep’s presence being documented.

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Watching and waiting for the next hand-off of paper.

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Daniel Salin, a producer and curator for art shows and an installer for the famous international street artist Banksy, takes a break from working on the scissors truck. Daniel was connected with Aaron through Sinuhé. He has done the Barracuda wall before with Shep and photograffeur JR.

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Documenting is done from all angles.

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Daniel, Shep and Eric Becker

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The face gets closer to completion.

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Urban Indians: navajo and her daughter mangolind watch the mural’s progress.

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Aaron and Shep paste the mural’s strips on the top edge of the wall.

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Shep and Daniel, covered in wheat paste.

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Aaron finishes the last square of paper!

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He turns around with a grin.

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Aaron, Daryl and Shep pose with the completed project.

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Now for the Pièce de Résistance: The billboard is tagged with HONOR THE TREATIES.org

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Chet, Aaron, Sinuhé and Daniel are happy to be done.

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Sinuhé and Aaron snap pics of their work from across the street.

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Aaron, navajo, Sinuhé, Daniel and Taylor Kent, who documented the project with a time-lapse camera across the street.

You can browse more than 290 of navajo’s photos of the installation here by clicking the slideshow button.

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HOW YOU CAN DIRECTLY HELP THE LAKOTA:

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#1: Share and Tweet this diary with your networks.

Honor The Treaties at Facebook.

#2: Support the organization that directly helps the youth of Pine Ridge who are featured in the images above.


The Owe Aku International Justice Project DONATE is guided daily by traditional leaders and elders who speak our language and live our Lakota way of life.  This approach has preserved our nation for 170 years against unyielding attempts to annihilate, assimilate and legislate us out of existence.  Our goal is to do nothing more than continue the process left to us by our ancestors.

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Custer’s Pipeline & Genocide Denial (Edited)

( – promoted by navajo)

A Canadian company has the legal right to condemn land for a crude-oil pipeline through the eastern part of the state (South Dakota in this case) –

Custer’s method of attack was a four front attack at dawn on sleeping villages. It seems an extreme comparison to make, even irresponsible. Is it however, since George W. Bush and the Neoconservative forces in the U.S. and in Canada who de-affirmed the U.N. Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples are going to finish what Custer started in the sacred Black Hills? Custer discovered gold there and that brought the railroad along with cultural destruction in the very least. Today, uranium has been being drilled for, and more cultural destruction will probably tragically come about as the result of the TransCanada Keystone Project. But wait, that’s not the only problem.

Considering the degrees of difference between the mid – 1860’s and now in regards to Native Population, language loss, cultural loss (many ceremonies were lost, for example), and that Custer was responsible for a great deal of the loss – I consider this to be Custer’s Pipeline.


“Judge denies Stay”

“Drilling to continue”

Powertech, a Canadian mining company, began drilling uranium exploratory wells in the Dewey Burdock area northwest of Edgemont a few weeks despite the approval of their permit being appealed in court.


Black Hills Announces Additional Texas Pipeline Acquisition

Rapid City, SD – Black Hills Energy, Inc., the integrated energy subsidiary of Black Hills Corporation today announced the purchase of the assets of the Kilgore to Houston Pipeline System from Equilon Pipeline Company, LLC. The pipeline will be operated by the Company’s Houston-based oil pipeline and transportation company, Black Hills Operating Company, LLC, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Black Hills Energy Resources, Inc.

The Kilgore pipeline transports crude oil from the Kilgore, TX region south to Houston, TX, which is the transfer point to connecting carriers via the Oiltanking Houston terminal facilities. The 10-inch pipeline is approximately 190 miles long and has a capacity of approximately 35,000 barrels per day for sweet and 23,000 barrels per day for sour type crude oil. In addition, the Kilgore system has approximately 400,000 barrels of crude oil storage at Kilgore and 375,000 barrels of storage at the Texoma Tank Farm located in Longview, TX. These storage facilities will eventually be interchangeable between the two tank farms.

I’ve mentioned before that Custer was a rapist, the pipeline will be yet more rape of the Earth Mother.

Project OVERVIEW

The Keystone Oil Pipeline (Keystone) is a proposed 2,969 kilometre (1,845 mile) pipeline with an initial nominal capacity to transport approximately 435,000 barrels per day of crude oil from Hardisty, Alberta, to U.S. Midwest markets at Wood River and Patoka, Illinois.

– snip –

The commercial commitments support the expansion of the Keystone Pipeline to a nominal capacity of approximately 590,000 barrels per day and will involve the construction of a 473-kilometre (294-mile) extension of the U.S. portion of the pipeline from the Nebraska/Kansas border to a hub near Cushing, Oklahoma. The expansion and extension target in-service date is fourth quarter 2010.
 

The total length of the proposed Keystone Pipeline is 1,845 miles (2,969 kilometres).

o Approximately 1,078 miles (1,735 kilometres) of new pipeline will be constructed in the U.S.

o The Canadian portion of the proposed project includes the construction of approximately 230 miles (370 kilometres) of new pipeline and the conversion of approximately 537 miles (864 kilometres) of existing TransCanada pipeline from natural gas to crude oil transmission.

o


To conclude, Custer’s dawn attacks upon sleeping villages were for the element of surprise. I think it’s fair to say that stealing land and attempts at steal land is now expected; however, the “element of surprise” has been replaced by historical trauma,


Native Americans suffer from ‘historical trauma,’ researcher says

REDLANDS, Calif. (UMNS) – The treatment given to American Indians as the United States pushed its boundaries westward has resulted in an ongoing emotional condition that a Native American social worker-researcher calls “historical trauma.”

The “element of surprise” has also been replaced by violence and rape on reservations. How can all of or even most of the people who remain defend their way of life and their culture effectively, while being in the grips of historical trauma, rape, violence and teen suicides?


Domestic violence a problem on Montana reservations

Women’s advocates in Montana say violence against Native women is an everyday occurrence on the state’s reservations.

Nonetheless, they continue to strive on.


Source

(Custer, South Dakota) – While some South Dakota whites will always be bitter about the Wounded Knee standoff over three decades ago, a Native American national newspaper reporter says a recent benefit concert was a step toward healing race relations while raising money to fight an alarming increase in domestic violence and teen suicide on the Lakota Rosebud Reservation.


Source

Teen suicide is two to three times higher among American Indian and Native Alaskan youths than among other ethnic groups and the general population. People in Indian Country recognize the numbers, Flatt said.

Very last of all, is that genocide denial helps to keep the help so desperately needed away in the appropriate forms that have been requested time and time again by leaders of the tribes. George W. Bush and the Neoconservative forces in the U.S. and in Canada who de-affirmed the U.N. Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples have now all but said that these American Indians aren’t human beings.

Genocide denial is much more common than realized.

Reject the Lie of White “Genocide” Against Native Americans

Funny thing, all my life I thought I was a human being in the eyes of everyone –


Pilgrims Pilloried in streets of Plymouth

Hitler wasn’t stopped by the Apaches but by the armies of that country whose conception the Plymouth protesters mourn.

The activists were outraged by my description of the Indians as primitives with a Stone Age culture that had neither a written language, metallurgy nor the wheel.

Reality is awfully insensitive. Still, it’s important to recall that Native Americans did not build great canoes and cross the Big Water to discover Europe.

Theodore Roosevelt spent several years ranching in the Dakotas while there was still a frontier. In “The Winning of the West,” Roosevelt wrote: “Not only were the Indians very terrible in battle, but they were cruel beyond all belief in victory; and the gloomy annals of border warfare are stained with their darkest hues because it was a war in which helpless women and children suffered the same hideous fate that so often befell their husbands and fathers.”

Apparently not.

But then again, genocide denial is part of the steel that drills the oil in “Custer’s Pipeline.”


John (Fire) Lame Deer And Richard Erdoes. “Lame Deer, Seeker of Visions.” p.96.

There’s a little Custer in all those sightseers, souvenir hunters, rock hounds, tourist scalpers, sharps and Deadwood hookers which cover these hills (Black Hills) like so many ants.

I couldn’t agree more with the Native American Rights Fund, “The Indian Wars never ended.”

Custer and his 7th Calvary may not be on horseback approaching unsuspecting villages, but it could be said that they’ve gone from horseback to the modern day “Battlefield,” the courtroom. The urgent thing to know is, Custer is winning, metaphorically speaking.


Historic meeting ends on pessimistic note

Determining the pipeline’s effects on cultural places appeared to have been a cursory and simplistic process.

Longtime efforts by preservation professionals to protect the more ineffable indigenous sites – vision quest places, pilgrimage trails, natural resources critical to a craft, habitats of culturally important animals and even places with no material manifestations at all – were disregarded.

At one point, an Entrix consultant offered to give Native people $400 per day to walk alongside the machinery during construction; however, the job came without authority to stop work if a site was struck.

In addition to what I’ve already cited:

The Northern Cheyenne have serious concerns about land encroachment

Cattle has been stolen off of Indian land as recent as 2002.

In February of this year (2007), “representative Joseph J. Suhrada (R) simply stated that “They [the county] want to get rid of the Indians”.

(Emphasis mine)

FRONTLINE #1705 Air Date: October 6, 1998

ARCHIE HOFFMAN: I guess he did check into the Fort Reno property and found out about all that gas and oil under Fort Reno. So he seen money there, about $50 million. He wanted us to sign a contract giving him 10 percent of that, and he’d get that property back for us. And he said, but if we didn’t do that, he said he’d make sure we never got that property back, you know?

BILL MOYERS: “They want the land given back to them on a platter,” Landow told FRONTLINE when he refused an on-camera interview. “They brought in innocent people like me. They’re a bunch of goddamn uneducated Indians.”

I could go on and on, but isn’t this the basic deplorable negative attitude beneath all this?

‘Oz’ author called for genocide of the Lakota

Six days after the massacre, while the frozen bodies of the Lakota men, women and children were being dumped into a mass grave, L. Frank Baum, the editor of a weekly newspaper in Aberdeen, SD, wrote an editorial calling for the annihilation of any Lakota still alive.

His editorial read in part, “Having wronged them once perhaps we should wrong them again and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.”

I’ll reiterate and finish this.

Genocide denial is part of the steel that drills the oil in “Custer’s Pipeline,” is part of what moves the pens making lying papers that are stealing and have stolen the promised sovereignty of American Indians, and what makes the modern day Custers feel joy when they succeed and rage when they fail.

Professor of Philosophy Henry Theriault Discusses Comparative Dimension of Genocide Denial

Nevertheless, denial of the genocide of Native Americans is still very strong. It works primarily through omission; people just refuse to talk about the issue. There was a strong backlash to newspaper editorials urging free discussion of this topic, which were published in 1992, the fifth centenary of the European discovery of the Americas. That denial has continued in the past decade, and deniers try to explain the extermination of the Native Americans as just an unfortunate event.

Even when Native Americans sue the government to reclaim their lands on violated treaty grounds, the courts usually throw these cases out. Moreover, when uranium was discovered in the 20th century in Native American reservations, the US claimed the uranium in the name of national security, without proper compensation.

I want to support a solution, which is to get Genocide Education into the classrooms everywhere, far and wide. I sincerely believe that it is needed for the Great Indian Holocaust –

Leonard Crow Dog and Richard Erdoes. “Crow Dog.” pp. 6-7.

Only when we saw them building roads through our land, wagons at first, and then the railroad, when we watched them building forts, killing off all the game, committing buffalo genocide, and we saw them ripping up our Black Hills for gold, our sacred Paha Sapa, the home of the wakinyan, the thunderbirds, only then did we realize what they wanted was our land. Then we began to fight. For our earth. For our children. That started what the whites call the Great Indian Wars of the West. I call it the Great Indian Holocaust.

– in addition to the Genocide Education that is already being taught.

Education As A Tool For Combating Armenian Genocide And Holocaust Denial

Bartrop went on to discuss the various forms and processes of denial, including either rationalizing or trivializing genocide, how deniers falsify research findings, misquote or dismiss the veracity of the evidence to the contrary.  “Teaching about genocide is a matter of self-interest if we wish to live in a civilized society which elevates humanity and denigrates barbarism of the kind the perpetrators of genocide have practiced,” concluded Dr. Bartrop.

Edited for the following reason:


Alaska House approves TransCanada gas pipeline

ANCHORAGE, Alaska, July 22 (Reuters) – Alaska’s House of Representatives voted late on Tuesday to allow TransCanada Corp.(TRP.TO: Quote, Profile, Research, Stock Buzz) to build a massive pipeline to tap the vast natural gas resources of the state’s North Slope region.

The chamber voted 24-16 in the state capital of Juneau for a bill backed by Governor Sarah Palin that would grant TransCanada a state license for a 1,700-mile (2,700 km) pipeline to bring the gas to North American markets.

– snip –

Palin, a Republican, has endorsed TransCanada’s plan to build the pipeline from Prudhoe Bay to an existing hub on the Alberta-British Columbia border, shipping 4 billion cubic feet a day. She argues the company, as an independent pipeline operator, would free the state and the North Slope from the dominance of the major oil producers there — BP (BP.L: Quote, Profile, Research, Stock Buzz), ConocoPhillips (COP.N: Quote, Profile, Research, Stock Buzz) and Exxon Mobil (XOM.N: Quote, Profile, Research, Stock Buzz).

Bad News about Bear Butte

( – promoted by navajo)

“We continue to believe that someone important someplace cares and will do something before our situation becomes impossible.” Fools Crow from “Fools Crow,” by Thomas E. Mails. p. 217

It’s gone from bad,


Please forward in its entirety.

Press release

Corporate America ~vs~ Sacred Sites

Decision on Bear Butte issue 7-1-08

written by: Tamra Brennan

On July 1st, 2008 the Meade County Commissioners voted 3 – 2 to approve Jay Allen’s liquor license, for the Broken Spoke Campground located at Bear Butte.

There were two separate issues discussed regarding liquor license applications. The initial license for Jay Allen, which was revoked on December 5, 2007, appealed in January, then remanded back to the Meade County Commissioners by Judge Bastian on April 14, 2008. Meade County Commissioners appealed the judges decision, in June the South Dakota Supreme Court, denied the appeal, again sending it back to Meade County Commissioners.

to worse.

The second issue was the new liquor license application filed by David Shoe, General Manager for the new investors Target Logistics, Broken Spoke Campground LLC.

Target Logistics has paid off all of Jay Allen’s outstanding debts for Broken Spoke Campground, LLC with the exception of one that is currently in litigation. They have dumped hundreds of thousands of dollars, if not more, into this place already. Jim Seward attorney for Target Logistics also stated that Jay Allen still owns 30% of the stock, which contradicts everything that they have testified to previously, which was that Jay Allen is no longer involved. These people change their story at every hearing.

Target Logistics Corporation showed up at the hearing with 12-15 suits, including the CEO, various attorneys and military personnel. They spent a hour of the hearing testifying about military issues, and praising David Shoe, since he was previously involved in Blackwater, had been in Afganstitan and Iraq and apparently has secret service clearance, even today. They actually brought previous military personnel here to testify on behalf of David Shoe’s character, for a liquor license at a bar located at Bear Butte.

They used the war, they used the military service to gain sympathy and support from the Meade County Commissioners, to acquire the license.

Does anyone see the irony here? Can someone please explain what the military has to do with a bar, at a sacred site and what they are doing here?

The supporters for the Bear Butte issue were sitting listening to this testimony, wondering what any of this had to do, with Meade County and a bar at Bear Butte?

Several people stood up and questioned these statements and motives.

Jack Doyle, a local Meade County resident continually testifies against our side, and always includes disgusting and racist comments, stated “Indians do not own Bear Butte mountain, they are their as guests, if its not suitable for them they can go somewhere else.”

Another local, life long resident and Bear Butte supporter stood up and addressed the Commissioners and Target Logistics, stated she felt that Target Logistics was making a bad business decision, and they obviously had not done a business marketing analysis, that there have been two local campgrounds go bankrupt over this past two years, maybe they should go invest in one of the bankrupt campgrounds, there is one available in Whitewood. She received a huge applaud from the Bear Butte supporters.

I did record the hearing and will be cutting it down, it’s an hour and a half, once I get that done, I will be posting it on our new blog talk radio show. It should be up within the next day. I will send out a link, once it is up and running.

It will also be posted on our website

http://www.protectbearbutte

Because it was the appealed license that was approved, I am going to be doing some checking and see what actions, if any, that we can take next to appeal this decision.

Needless to say, this is simply another case of Corporate America ~vs~ Native American people and sacred sites, and we lost, yet again.

In peace & solidarity,

Tamra

http://www.NDNnews.com

www.ProtectSacredSites.org

www.protectbearbutte.com

Sign up for email updates about Bear Butte!

“Providing news and information about Native American Issues & Causes”

“Helping to make a difference for our people in Indian Country, one day at a time.

What will you do today to help make a difference?”

“Our sacred lands are all that remain keeping us connected to our place on Mother Earth, to our spirituality, our heritage and our lands; what’s left of them. If they take it all away, what will remain except a vague memory of a past so forgotten?”

Join our friends list on my space at http://www. myspace.com/ndnnews

and

www.myspace.com/protectsacredsites

Also, join our yahoo group at Protecting our Ancestors & Sacred Sites

Photobucket

Two things stand out. The ignorance with racism,

Jack Doyle, a local Meade County resident continually testifies against our side, and always includes disgusting and racist comments, stated “Indians do not own Bear Butte mountain, they are their as guests, if its not suitable for them they can go somewhere else.”

and the fact they “used the military service to gain sympathy and support from the Meade County Commissioners, to acquire the license.”

Target Logistics Corporation showed up at the hearing with 12-15 suits, including the CEO, various attorneys and military personnel. They spent a hour of the hearing testifying about military issues, and praising David Shoe, since he was previously involved in Blackwater, had been in Afganstitan and Iraq and apparently has secret service clearance, even today. They actually brought previous military personnel here to testify on behalf of David Shoe’s character, for a liquor license at a bar located at Bear Butte.

They used the war; they used the military service to gain sympathy and support from the Meade County Commissioners, to acquire the license.

Does anyone see the irony here? Can someone please explain what the military has to do with a bar, at a sacred site and what they are doing here?

Racism and anti -Indian sentiments are a foregone conclusion, they allow the thieves to justify what they’re doing. But as for “what the military has to do with a bar, at a sacred site and what they are doing here?” It’s probably, you know, a secret.

Top Secret

 

Action Call: BEAR BUTTE ISSUE MORE CRITICAL THAN EVER!

( – promoted by navajo)


Kevin Woster:


Many years ago, the federal courts ruled that the Black Hills of western South Dakota had been taken illegally from the American Indian tribes –

As governor, would you consider transferring Bear Butte State Park land and management to a consortium of American Indian Tribes as a gesture of reconciliation from the state?

Mike Rounds, Republican candidate in 2006:


“I do not believe that Bear Butte State Park, and it is a state park,
should be transferred to a Native American tribe.

I’m not sure which Native American tribe you might suggest (that) you hold
that they are all sovereign.

SD Governors Discuss Bear Butte


Why is the Bear Butte issue more critical than ever?

From Protect Bear Butte:

(Seems only first link in bulletin is still working)

Contact us at info@ProtectBearButte.com


—————– Bulletin Message —————–

From: NDN News

Date: Apr 23, 2008 10:17 PM

Hello Everyone,

Please forward this flier widely! If you can, print them out, distribute them, post them, whatever you can think of! Please help spread the word! If you want it as a Microsoft word document, for easier printing, email me! We appreciate all of your help and support to protect sacred sites!

Thank you!In peace & solidarity,(name not posted)

www. NDNnews. com

www. ProtectSacredSites. org http://bearbutte. blogspot. com/“Providing news and information about Native American Issues & Causes” “Helping to make a difference for our people in Indian Country, one day at a time.

What will you do today to help make a difference?” “Our sacred lands are all that remain keeping us connected to our place on Mother Earth, to our spirituality, our heritage and our lands; what’s left of them. If they take it all away, what will remain except a vague memory of a past so forgotten?”

Join our friends list on my space at http://www. myspace. com/ndnnews andhttp://www.myspace.com/protectsacredsites

Also, join our yahoo group at Protecting our Ancestors & Sacred Sites

Photobucket

Protect Sacred Sites Indigenous People, One Nation is a grass roots organization, which works towards protecting our sacred sites across the country. We are a local organization actively working on the Protection of Bear Butte, in South Dakota.

BEAR BUTTE ISSUE MORE CRITICAL THAN EVER! SACRED SITES ARE WORTH THE FIGHT! Greetings to all my relations, I am writing to you today to alert you to the commercial desecration of land held sacred by nearly all the Plains American Indian Nations, Bear Butte.  This blatant disregard for the spiritual beliefs and traditional and cultural treasure of thousands of people is evidenced by the continuing and mounting presence of bars, clubs, strobe lights, a proposed stadium, and other venues of crass commercial entertainment. Bear Butte is a sacred site located eight miles west of Sturgis, South Dakota. It is registered as a National Historical Landmark. Bear Butte is sacred to the Plains Tribes, many continue to travel to the mountain each summer to pray and hold their annual ceremonies. Instead of praying in peace, traditional people are forced to pray with loud music from bars, mufflers and flashing strobe lights over the mountain. For the past few years there has been a continual encroachment of bars and venues heading towards the sacred mountain. In the summer of 2006, the massive two story bar opened just one mile from the mountain, called Sturgis County Line. Their goal is to have a 50,000 seat concert stadium and a RV park, in addition to the newly built two story bar. The owner of this location, Jay Allen has been disrespectful from the start. He initially wanted to call the location “On Sacred Ground” and erect an 80-foot Indian statue pointing towards the sacred mountain. Of course this was not viewed lightly, there has been a major battle to shut Jay Allen down, ever since.

There have been several developments since the summer of 2006, expansions are in progress and things are potentially getting worse. On April 14, 2008, Jay Allen announced a new partnership with a travel corporation from Boston, MA. In addition to this new partnership, they announced their plans to open the Sturgis County Line, year round. Biker rally events are NOW scheduled in June, July and August for the Sturgis Rally. So far, over a thousand bikers are scheduled to attend each event in June and July. The concert venue will be moving forward, by next summer they could have a 50,000 seat concert stadium, one mile from Bear Butte! With this new year round expansion, it will virtually become impossible ALL summer, to pray in peace at Bear Butte.  This issue has escalated and is now, more critical than ever. We are continuing the struggle to Protect Bear Butte and hope you will join us in these efforts!  

What YOU can do to help! Help us create awareness for the continual desecration of sacred sites, including Bear Butte. Get actively involved! Take Action! Help spread the word! The goal is to create public awareness across the country about desecration of our sacred sites! Being proactive and creating awareness, is one of the many ways, WE EACH can help to make a difference. Join our Bear Butte Working Group! We need pro-active, dedicated people who are willing to help in this continual struggle. Email us to find out how YOU can help Protect Bear Butte!  Talk with as MANY BIKERS as you can! Ask for their support on this issue, to not endorse Jay Allen’s Sturgis County Line.

The motto is Bikers for Bear Butte!

Sign up for our email updates! We send out announcements, updates, action alerts, upcoming meetings, hearings and information about current status.

Contact us at info@ProtectBearButte.com

Black Hills & “The (Real) Supreme Law of the Land”

( – promoted by navajo)

…Among the Courts’ cases, 240 of 375 recognized American Indian treaties have been cited 992 times in 342 opinions between the years 1884 and 2004.

Constitution Background


Source

ARTICLE VI


This Constitution, and Laws of the United States which shall be made Pursuance thereof; and all Treaties made, or which shall be made, under the Authority of the United Stated, shall be the supreme Law of the Land; and the Judges in every State shall be bound thereby, any Thing in the Constitution or Laws of any State to the Contrary notwithstanding
.

So, why is Pe Sla in the Black Hills likely to become a “Sea of Houses?”

The first reason, is that treaties must not be “the supreme Law of the Land.”


Source

In the 1868 treaty, signed at Fort Laramie and other military posts in Sioux country, the United States recognized the Black Hills as part of the Great Sioux Reservation, set aside for exclusive use by the Sioux people. In 1874, however, General George A. Custer led an expedition into the Black Hills accompanied by miners who were seeking gold. Once gold was found in the Black Hills, miners were soon moving into the Sioux hunting grounds and demanding protection from the United States Army. Soon, the Army was ordered to move against wandering bands of Sioux hunting on the range in accordance with their treaty rights. In 1876, Custer, leading an army detachment, encountered the encampment of Sioux and Cheyenne at the Little Bighorn River. Custer’s detachment was annihilated, but the United States would continue its battle against the Sioux in the Black Hills until the government confiscated the land in 1877. To this day, ownership of the Black Hills remains the subject of a legal dispute between the U.S. government and the Sioux.

A second reason is, the Forest Service and the Pennington County Highway Department are ignoring that fact thatthe Lakota Nation has never accepted any money for the Black Hills; it legally belongs to the Lakota Nation.



Source

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at Fort Laramie, in the Indian Territory, between D. D. Mitchell, superintendent of Indian affairs, and Thomas Fitzpatrick, Indian agent, commissioners specially appointed and authorized by the President of the United States, of the first part, and the chiefs, headmen, and braves of the following Indian nations, residing south of the Missouri River, east of the Rocky Mountains, and north of the lines of Texas and New Mexico, viz, the Sioux or Dahcotahs, Cheyennes, Arrapahoes, Crows, Assinaboines, Gros-Ventre Mandans, and Arrickaras, parties of the second part, on the seventeenth day of September, A.D. one thousand eight hundred and fifty-one. (a)

– snip –

ARTICLE 3. In consideration of the rights and privileges acknowledged in the preceding article, the United States bind themselves to protect the aforesaid Indian nations against the commission of all depredations by the people of the said United States, after the ratification of this treaty.

– snip –

The territory of the Sioux or Dahcotah Nation, commencing the mouth of the White Earth River, on the Missouri River; thence in a southwesterly direction to the forks of the Platte River; thence up the north fork of the Platte River to a point known as the Red Buts, or where the road leaves the river; thence along the range of mountains known as the Black Hills, to the head-waters of Heart River; thence down Heart River to its mouth; and thence down the Missouri River to the place of beginning.

Last of all that I’m mentioning, is that they need to especially adhere with common sense to the first, third, and fourth points made by Judge Elmer Dundy in his decision after the trial of Standing Bear.

(emphasis mine)


“First. That an Indian is a person with the meaning of the laws of the United States,
and has therefore the right to sue out a writ of habeas corpus in a federal court and before a federal judge, in all cases where he may be confined, or in custody under color of authority of the United States, or where he is restrained of liberty in violation of the constitution or laws of the United States.

– snip –

“Third. That no rightful authority exists for removing by force
any of the relators to the Indian Territory, as the respondent has been directed to do.

   “Fourth. That the Indians possess the inherent right of expatriation as well as the more fortunate white race, and have the inalienable right to ‘life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness,’
so long as they obey the laws and do not trespass on forbidden ground.

As I said before.


To conclude and once again, “It is only a matter of time that further abuse and possible desecration will take place so that we must tell the story of this sacred site.  Action must be taken to preserve this prairie for future generations;” and, if they were considering condemning hundreds of churches for the sake of “development” or uranium for that matter, we wouldn’t even be having this discussion.

So, what’s the real “supreme Law of the Land” when it comes to the United States dealing with the American Indian Nations?


Red Cloud

“They made us many promises, more than I can remember, but they never kept but one; they promised to take our land and they took it.”

Pe Sla in Black Hills: to be “Sea of Houses”

( – promoted by navajo)



Consolidated Indigenous Shadow Report. p. 34.

…the continuation and preservation of traditional Native American Religion is ensured only through the performance of ceremonies and rites by tribal members. These ceremonies and rites are often performed on specific sites…These sites may also be based on special geographic features…For most Native American religions, there may be no alternative places of worship since these ceremonies must be performed at certain places and times to be effective.

Such is the case at Pe Sla, “one of the five primary sacred sites in the Black Hills to the Lakota nation.”

Source

The Pe Sla is one of the five primary sacred sites in the Black Hills to the Lakota nation because of its position on their annual pilgrimage/journey of prayers and ceremonies.  It is also the only one held mostly in private hands as others are within state or federal property.  This prairie has only known cattle grazing by a handful of ranchers since the Homestead Act.  Now subdivisions are encroaching upon this one pristine open space left in the Black Hills.

I can not speak for any tribe and here is my opinion. I think the ACLU should be seriously considered in terms of asking them to sue the appropriate parties over suffocating the religious freedom of the Lakota Nation to start with. I’m “seeking a way to protect this place,” so I didn’t mention cultural genocide.

(emphasis and underline mine)

Source

When the Forest Service was asked about a cabin being renovated as a memorial to the ranching history on the Pe Sla, the questioners reminded them that there was a much longer history of this site among the Lakota.  The Forest Service representative told us that the Lakota elders with whom they consult told them no one wanted that information known.  A few months later when an official from the county government was standing on Rochford Road that runs through the middle of the Pe Sla or Reynolds Prairie, he exclaimed with great satisfaction that “soon this road will be a black ribbon (paved with asphalt) and this prairie will be a sea of houses”.
 Unfortunately, it is only a matter of time that further abuse and possible desecration will take place so that we must tell the story of this sacred site.  Action must be taken to preserve this prairie for future generations.  

• Please pray for its preservation and for the awareness of its spiritual significance to all people.  

• Please tell the story to all whom you know.  

Please show your support by seeking ways to protect this place.  Some of those possibilities are outlined below.

Furthermore, I think Joe Garcia, President of the NCAI, should be contacted by the ACLU in order to proceed in the manner which would not damage tribal sovereignty in any fashion what-so-ever.


NCAI

National Congress of American Indians (NCAI)

1301 Connecticut Ave NW, Suite 200, Washington D.C. 20036

Phone: (202) 466-7767, Fax: (202) 466-7797

Email: ncai@ncai.org

The ACLU could do a fund and membership drive revolving around this, which would hopefully increase their membership and help raise finances for the case. Everything considered, what are the other alternatives?


Source

The Pennington County Highway Department held a meeting regarding the reconstruction of South Rochford Road at Hill City, SD, on Monday, March 3, 2008, at 6:30 pm. This project runs from Deerfield Lake to the village of Rochford passing through the middle of Reynolds Prairie, or the Pe Sla, one of the most important and sacred Lakota annual pilgrimage sites. Currently it is a gravel road but the plans are to asphalt eleven (11) miles of road with $7.5 million dollars. If the road is blacktopped, housing development and increased traffic will occur. The Hill City Chamber of Commerce is pushing this project.

If they were considering condemning hundreds of churches for the sake of “development” or uranium for that matter, we wouldn’t even be having this discussion; a discussion that both Obama and Clinton should have in South Dakota and Montana.


Letter: Clinton, Obama should debate Indian issues

“Montana and South Dakota are scheduled to hold Democratic primaries June 3. No other state is having a primary that week. In fact, there are no Democratic state contests in the two weeks leading up to June 3. With more than 125,000 citizens who identify themselves as American Indian in these two states, I believe we should urge the Obama and Clinton campaigns to come to an Indian reservation in Montana or South Dakota to debate Indian country issues.

To conclude and once again, “It is only a matter of time that further abuse and possible desecration will take place so that we must tell the story of this sacred site.  Action must be taken to preserve this prairie for future generations;” and, if they were considering condemning hundreds of churches for the sake of “development” or uranium for that matter, we wouldn’t even be having this discussion.

Uranium Mining almost near Grand Canyon and is Elsewhere!

( – promoted by navajo)



Source

A British mining company is about to begin exploratory drilling for toxic, radioactive uranium in Kaibab National Forest just outside the eco-fragile boundaries of Grand Canyon National Park.

Of course, the idea of uranium is being sold as if it were an absolute necessity.

Do these companies really care about the beauty of the Earth Mother,

Photobucket

they’re altering for the worst?

Photobucket

(only photo of a uranium mine I could find)

No.


Source

This ill-conceived drilling is powerful evidence that tighter restrictions must be enacted to protect the Canyon. It further indicates the critical need to modernize the General Mining Act of 1872, which authorizes mining for economic minerals on federal public lands.

Funny thing about that capitalistic motivation is that in spite of it, there is now an example of an energy efficient home from Extreme Makeover.

So, let’s consider clean energy usage from that new Navajo home verses “high levels of cancer and areas of radioactivity.”


Source

Uranium mining has been linked to high levels of cancer and areas of radioactivity on the Navajo Reservation. The tribe has banned it. The various mining techniques used all risk contaminating the groundwater aquifer or surface water.

Next, let’s consider clean energy usage from that new Navajo home verses “how the uranium mining will affect their water, livestock and their families.”


Source

People in Wyoming and South Dakota are afraid of how the uranium mining will affect their water, livestock and their families, just like their Coloradan neighbors to the south, but they are more afraid of the ramifications of speaking up, White Face said.

Last of all, let’s consider clean energy usage from that new Navajo home verses “Uranium dust from abandoned open-pit mines in Wyoming makes its way into South Dakota, she said, and it even finds its way into the Cheyenne River, which flows into South Dakota’s Black Hills, uranium-rich in its own right.”


Source

White Face said she’s seen firsthand the sorts of things uranium can do to public health, even in more remote parts of the United States. Uranium dust from abandoned open-pit mines in Wyoming makes its way into South Dakota, she said, and it even finds its way into the Cheyenne River, which flows into South Dakota’s Black Hills, uranium-rich in its own right.

Oh wait,
we need to consider clean energy usage from that new Navajo home verses “… make(ing) yellowcake. That material can be turned into weapons-grade uranium or enhanced for use in nuclear power plants.”


Source

Groundwater is oxidized and turned into a solution called a “lixiviant,” which is forced down into the sandstone layers, where the uranium is essentially drawn to combine with the water. The solution is pumped back to the surface and combined with resin beads in a process that works basically the same way as a home water softener. Molecules of uranium hop on to the resin beads, which are taken to a processing facility to strip the uranium off, refine it and make yellowcake. That material can be turned into weapons-grade uranium or enhanced for use in nuclear power plants.

I’d said earlier that there’s a funny thing about that capitalistic motivation,

The military-industrial complex is generally defined as a “coalition consisting of the military and industrialists who profit by manufacturing arms and selling them to the government.”

which is why I don’t foresee the clean energy usage from that new Navajo home being used widely anytime soon, or in my lifetime.

Uranium mining is no solution to the impending doom of it now being merely five minutes to midnight,

(emphasis mine)


IT IS 5 MINUTES TO MIDNIGHT

The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists’ Doomsday Clock conveys how close humanity is to catastrophic destruction–the figurative midnight–and monitors the means humankind could use to obliterate itself. First and foremost, these include nuclear weapons, but they also encompass climate-changing technologies and new developments in the life sciences and nanotechnology that could inflict irrevocable harm.

– snip –

Unfortunately, however, the possibility of a nuclear exchange between countries remains.

as uranium mining becomes more common, it may facilitate even more “possibility of a nuclear exchange between countries,”  drawing us closer to midnight.


Threat of Nuclear Autumn

Famine sweeps the Third World. A billion people flee across borders. Vast regions become abandoned. Governments fall. Hundreds of millions die.

This is the future that might overwhelm the planet if any of the eight nuclear-armed countries – or the 35 other countries with enough weapons-grade fuel build their own bombs – start blasting their enemy’s cities with low-yield nuclear weapons.

(Take accordingly. I don’t think anyone but real intelligence has the real numbers, but the point is made)

Where are the bombs?

Pakistan –
– 52 warheads

India –
– 85 warheads

Israel –
– 116 warheads

Britain –
– 200 + warheads

France –
– 350 warheads

China —
 400 warheads

USA –
– 10,315 warheads

Russia –
– 16,200 warheads

Think how much uranium had to be used to make all those nuclear weapons and how much beautiful land had to be ruined. Furthermore, think of how much “uranium dust from abandoned open-pit mines” caused health problems, how much uranium mining affected “water, livestock, and families,” and the cumulative effects of the “high levels of cancer and areas of radioactivity” caused by all those uranium mines.

The uranium mining companies must be soooooooooooooo concerned about the possible future of our planet,

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or not.

Crossposted at The Wild Wild Left

Custer Wannabes Happy about Pipeline & Black Hills

( – promoted by navajo)


Custer’s Pipeline & Genocide Denial

Genocide denial is part of the steel that drills the oil in “Custer’s Pipeline,” is part of what moves the pens making lying papers that are stealing and have stolen the promised sovereignty of American Indians, and what makes the modern day Custers feel joy when they succeed and rage when they fail.

Looks like the modern- day Custers are feeling a little joy lately.

Source

TransCanada has decided to go ahead with its application for approval of a jumbo 42″ gas pipeline cut right through the middle of Lubicon land, without consultation and despite Lubicon objections. They have refused to answer even the most basic safety questions.

The Lubicon Nation needs help now! TransCanada is taking actions that not only open unceded Lubicon territory to even more ruthless and destructive “development”, but enable the huge expansion of toxic tarsands operations and so affect all of us.

Make that quite a bit,


Source

To the question of: “When will all 89 mines be cleaned up?” The answer from MSE was: “Not in your lifetime.”

of joy.


A Canadian company has the legal right to condemn land for a crude-oil pipeline through the eastern part of the state (South Dakota in this case) –

I’ve been working on a slow burn about this, especially after I read that the 89 mines in the Black Hills will not be cleaned up “in your (our) lifetime(s).”  Not only that, but that it looks like Bear Butte will be “almost entirely public land.” Even worse, it’s now “out of our hands.”

(emphasis & underline mine)

Four of the committee members, Representatives Ahlers, Engels, Street, and Nygaard, are to be praised for their extreme patience in sitting in a meeting in which their colleagues exhibited such disrespect to their efforts to submit additional amendments to the Bill. Toward the end of the hearing, Rep. Ahlers finally asked the other committee members to accept only one-half mile from the top of the sacred mountain stating, “This is only a sign of respect” as the land would be almost entirely public land. The other nine loudly hollered, “No!” as they had done time and time again to previous offers of amendments. After shouting their loud, disrespectful “Nos,”… then they would laugh.

Of course, there was racism present during this, imagine that.

To conclude this entire topic, unless something is said other that it’s “out of our hands” in the future, I’ll just state the obvious and conclude with Fool’s Crow’s words once more.

Manifest Destiny is alive and flourishing, and even though I’ve written about this here, here, here, and included it in several other diaries; it just wasn’t enough to add to what was/is already out there to make the difference that was needed.

So, for the last time:


WE SHALL NEVER SELL OUR SACRED BLACK HILLS

Kola (friends). I am Frank Fools Crow, Chief of the Lakota and I am here today with Frank Kills Enemy, one of the most respected headmen and also an expert on Indian treaty rights. Before we begin, I would like to ask you why when we speak you do not listen, and when you listen, you do not hear, and when you hear us, you do not choose to understand what we say. This is one time that I ask you to listen carefully and understand what we have to say.

The people unanimously reaffirmed our long-standing position that the Black Hills are not for sale under any circumstances. We are therefore standing behind the resolution we passed at Ft. Yates in February of this year. That resolution, my friends, reads:

The Black Hills are sacred to the Lakota people. Both the sacred pipe and the Black Hills go hand and hand in our religion. The Black Hills is our church, the place where we worship. The Black Hills is our burial grounds. The Bones of our grandfathers lie buried in those hills. How can you expect us to sell our church and our cemeteries for a few token whiteman dollars. We will never sell.

I’m sorry grandpa Fools Crow,

“We continue to believe that someone important someplace cares and will do something before our situation becomes impossible.”

Fools Crow from “Fools Crow,” by Thomas E. Mails. p. 217

I tried and contributed my best, but you taught us there are some things there aren’t cures for. I guess Manifest Destiny is one of them, but I’ll never stop hoping and praying about it.

Mitakuye Oyasin

Custer’s Pipeline & Genocide Denial

( – promoted by navajo)

A Canadian company has the legal right to condemn land for a crude-oil pipeline through the eastern part of the state (South Dakota in this case) –

Custer’s method of attack was a four front attack at dawn on sleeping villages. It seems an extreme comparison to make, even irresponsible. Is it however, since George W. Bush and the Neoconservative forces in the U.S. and in Canada who de-affirmed the U.N. Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples are going to finish what Custer started in the sacred Black Hills? Custer discovered gold there and that brought the railroad along with cultural destruction in the very least. Today, uranium has been being drilled for, and more cultural destruction will probably tragically come about as the result of the TransCanada Keystone Project. But wait, that’s not the only problem.

Considering the degrees of difference between the mid – 1860’s and now in regards to Native Population, language loss, cultural loss (many ceremonies were lost, for example), and that Custer was responsible for a great deal of the loss – I consider this to be Custer’s Pipeline.

“Judge denies Stay”
“Drilling to continue”

Powertech, a Canadian mining company, began drilling uranium exploratory wells in the Dewey Burdock area northwest of Edgemont a few weeks despite the approval of their permit being appealed in court.

Black Hills Announces Additional Texas Pipeline Acquisition

Rapid City, SD – Black Hills Energy, Inc., the integrated energy subsidiary of Black Hills Corporation today announced the purchase of the assets of the Kilgore to Houston Pipeline System from Equilon Pipeline Company, LLC. The pipeline will be operated by the Company’s Houston-based oil pipeline and transportation company, Black Hills Operating Company, LLC, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Black Hills Energy Resources, Inc.

The Kilgore pipeline transports crude oil from the Kilgore, TX region south to Houston, TX, which is the transfer point to connecting carriers via the Oiltanking Houston terminal facilities. The 10-inch pipeline is approximately 190 miles long and has a capacity of approximately 35,000 barrels per day for sweet and 23,000 barrels per day for sour type crude oil. In addition, the Kilgore system has approximately 400,000 barrels of crude oil storage at Kilgore and 375,000 barrels of storage at the Texoma Tank Farm located in Longview, TX. These storage facilities will eventually be interchangeable between the two tank farms.

I’ve mentioned before that Custer was a rapist, the pipeline will be yet more rape of the Earth Mother.

Project OVERVIEW

The Keystone Oil Pipeline (Keystone) is a proposed 2,969 kilometre (1,845 mile) pipeline with an initial nominal capacity to transport approximately 435,000 barrels per day of crude oil from Hardisty, Alberta, to U.S. Midwest markets at Wood River and Patoka, Illinois.

– snip –

The commercial commitments support the expansion of the Keystone Pipeline to a nominal capacity of approximately 590,000 barrels per day and will involve the construction of a 473-kilometre (294-mile) extension of the U.S. portion of the pipeline from the Nebraska/Kansas border to a hub near Cushing, Oklahoma. The expansion and extension target in-service date is fourth quarter 2010.
 

The total length of the proposed Keystone Pipeline is 1,845 miles (2,969 kilometres).
o Approximately 1,078 miles (1,735 kilometres) of new pipeline will be constructed in the U.S.
o The Canadian portion of the proposed project includes the construction of approximately 230 miles (370 kilometres) of new pipeline and the conversion of approximately 537 miles (864 kilometres) of existing TransCanada pipeline from natural gas to crude oil transmission.
o

To conclude, Custer’s dawn attacks upon sleeping villages were for the element of surprise. I think it’s fair to say that stealing land and attempts at steal land is now expected; however, the “element of surprise” has been replaced by historical trauma,

Native Americans suffer from ‘historical trauma,’ researcher says

REDLANDS, Calif. (UMNS) – The treatment given to American Indians as the United States pushed its boundaries westward has resulted in an ongoing emotional condition that a Native American social worker-researcher calls “historical trauma.”

The “element of surprise” has also been replaced by violence and rape on reservations. How can all of or even most of the people who remain defend their way of life and their culture effectively, while being in the grips of historical trauma, rape, violence and teen suicides?

Domestic violence a problem on Montana reservations

Women’s advocates in Montana say violence against Native women is an everyday occurrence on the state’s reservations.

Nonetheless, they continue to strive on.

Source

(Custer, South Dakota) – While some South Dakota whites will always be bitter about the Wounded Knee standoff over three decades ago, a Native American national newspaper reporter says a recent benefit concert was a step toward healing race relations while raising money to fight an alarming increase in domestic violence and teen suicide on the Lakota Rosebud Reservation.

Source

Teen suicide is two to three times higher among American Indian and Native Alaskan youths than among other ethnic groups and the general population. People in Indian Country recognize the numbers, Flatt said.

Very last of all, is that genocide denial helps to keep the help so desperately needed away in the appropriate forms that have been requested time and time again by leaders of the tribes. George W. Bush and the Neoconservative forces in the U.S. and in Canada who de-affirmed the U.N. Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples have now all but said that these American Indians aren’t human beings.

Reject the Lie of White “Genocide” Against Native Americans

Funny thing, all my life I thought I was a human being in the eyes of everyone –

Pilgrims Pilloried in streets of Plymouth

Hitler wasn’t stopped by the Apaches but by the armies of that country whose conception the Plymouth protesters mourn.

The activists were outraged by my description of the Indians as primitives with a Stone Age culture that had neither a written language, metallurgy nor the wheel.

Reality is awfully insensitive. Still, it’s important to recall that Native Americans did not build great canoes and cross the Big Water to discover Europe.

Theodore Roosevelt spent several years ranching in the Dakotas while there was still a frontier. In “The Winning of the West,” Roosevelt wrote: “Not only were the Indians very terrible in battle, but they were cruel beyond all belief in victory; and the gloomy annals of border warfare are stained with their darkest hues because it was a war in which helpless women and children suffered the same hideous fate that so often befell their husbands and fathers.”

Apparently not.

But then again, genocide denial is part of the steel that drills the oil in “Custer’s Pipeline.”

John (Fire) Lame Deer And Richard Erdoes. “Lame Deer, Seeker of Visions.” p.96.

There’s a little Custer in all those sightseers, souvenir hunters, rock hounds, tourist scalpers, sharps and Deadwood hookers which cover these hills (Black Hills) like so many ants.

I couldn’t agree more with the Native American Rights Fund, “The Indian Wars never ended.”
Custer and his 7th Calvary may not be on horseback approaching unsuspecting villages, but it could be said that they’ve gone from horseback to the modern day “Battlefield,” the courtroom. The urgent thing to know is, Custer is winning, metaphorically speaking. In addition to what I’ve already cited:

The Northern Cheyenne have serious concerns about land encroachment

Cattle has been stolen off of Indian land as recent as 2002.

In February of this year (2007), “representative Joseph J. Suhrada (R) simply stated that “They [the county] want to get rid of the Indians”.

(Emphasis mine)

FRONTLINE #1705 Air Date: October 6, 1998

ARCHIE HOFFMAN: I guess he did check into the Fort Reno property and found out about all that gas and oil under Fort Reno. So he seen money there, about $50 million. He wanted us to sign a contract giving him 10 percent of that, and he’d get that property back for us. And he said, but if we didn’t do that, he said he’d make sure we never got that property back, you know?

BILL MOYERS: “They want the land given back to them on a platter,” Landow told FRONTLINE when he refused an on-camera interview. “They brought in innocent people like me. They’re a bunch of goddamn uneducated Indians.”

I could go on and on, but isn’t this the basic deplorable negative attitude beneath all this?

‘Oz’ author called for genocide of the Lakota

Six days after the massacre, while the frozen bodies of the Lakota men, women and children were being dumped into a mass grave, L. Frank Baum, the editor of a weekly newspaper in Aberdeen, SD, wrote an editorial calling for the annihilation of any Lakota still alive.

His editorial read in part, “Having wronged them once perhaps we should wrong them again and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth.”

I’ll reiterate and finish this.

Genocide denial is part of the steel that drills the oil in “Custer’s Pipeline,” is part of what moves the pens making lying papers that are stealing and have stolen the promised sovereignty of American Indians, and what makes the modern day Custers feel joy when they succeed and rage when they fail.

Professor of Philosophy Henry Theriault Discusses Comparative Dimension of Genocide Denial

Nevertheless, denial of the genocide of Native Americans is still very strong. It works primarily through omission; people just refuse to talk about the issue. There was a strong backlash to newspaper editorials urging free discussion of this topic, which were published in 1992, the fifth centenary of the European discovery of the Americas. That denial has continued in the past decade, and deniers try to explain the extermination of the Native Americans as just an unfortunate event.

Even when Native Americans sue the government to reclaim their lands on violated treaty grounds, the courts usually throw these cases out. Moreover, when uranium was discovered in the 20th century in Native American reservations, the US claimed the uranium in the name of national security, without proper compensation.

I’d want to support this solution, which is to get Genocide Education into the classrooms everywhere, far and wide. I sincerely believe that it is needed for the Great Indian Holocaust –

Leonard Crow Dog and Richard Erdoes. “Crow Dog.” pp. 6-7.

Only when we saw them building roads through our land, wagons at first, and then the railroad, when we watched them building forts, killing off all the game, committing buffalo genocide, and we saw them ripping up our Black Hills for gold, our sacred Paha Sapa, the home of the wakinyan, the thunderbirds, only then did we realize what they wanted was our land. Then we began to fight. For our earth. For our children. That started what the whites call the Great Indian Wars of the West. I call it the Great Indian Holocaust.

– in addition to the Genocide Education that is already being taught.

Education As A Tool For Combating Armenian Genocide And Holocaust Denial

Bartrop went on to discuss the various forms and processes of denial, including either rationalizing or trivializing genocide, how deniers falsify research findings, misquote or dismiss the veracity of the evidence to the contrary.  “Teaching about genocide is a matter of self-interest if we wish to live in a civilized society which elevates humanity and denigrates barbarism of the kind the perpetrators of genocide have practiced,” concluded Dr. Bartrop.

(Updated) Modernized Manifest Destiny, “Ontario pulls out of Caledonia talks”

( – promoted by navajo)

(Correction: it was/is an American developer, not an American company. Plus, a new character)

I think this is a case in point of why the Neoconservative forces in the U.S. and in Canada de-affirmed the U.N. Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Final update is at the end.

Manifest Destiny is a thing of the past, but its philosophy didn’t die with the forced relocations. The American company developer Henco attempted to encroach on Native lands in 2006, and I speculate that George W. Bush’s having signed NAFTA treaties which eroded some limits on U.S trade borders enabled Henco to proceed to Canada and attempt stealing Native soil from Six Nations. While it wears only a shadow in sound comparison to the Seige of Wounded Knee 1973, (I think it’s more so comparable now than before; however, I don’t have the expertise about treaties and prior circumstances in Canada to say how much more or less it is. There was a treaty violation here. I’m not sure it’s my place to say more in general) it bears valid comparison in the display of overt racism against the First Nations.

Krisztina Kun, a staff member at SFPIRG, and eyewitness to the standoff remarked that the blockade was characterized just as much by racial tension as it was by disputes over land ownership.
SOURCE
 

Crossposted at Progressive Historians

The American Developer Henco attempted to acquire land in Canada by deceptive means.

SIX NATIONS AREN’T GOING TO BACK DOWN
SOURCE
“Henco Industries, the developer that is squatting on our land, went to court and got an injunction. Judge David Marshall of the Ontario Provincial Court thought he had a fool proof plan to get rid of the people protesting Ontario’s persistent violation of Six Nations Territory. On March 16 (2006) he issued a strange convoluted order. He announced that at 2:00 on Wednesday, March 22nd, the Ontario Provincial Police OPP would come in. They would read the order to us. Anyone who didn’t leave immediately would be arrested and taken to the police station where they would be photographed, fingerprinted and released. He also ordered that anyone who returned would be charged and placed on probation for a year. The trouble is he seemed to have forgotten about due process and the honor of the Crown. He didn’t mention a hearing or a trial. Neither Ontario nor Henco was required to prove they owned the land in question. This may have something to do with the report that Judge Marshall and the Crown Prosecutor, Owen Young, both claim parts of our land themselves.”

So, in addition to Henco deceptively trying to steal Six Nations Territory; the Judge and Crown Prosecuter were as well. This led to a huge protest, where Six Nations came together to stand against the attempted theft of their land by Henco, Marshall, and Young.

In the present case, protest was triggered by the construction of a massive housing subdivision in Caledonia, the Douglas Creek Estates (Henco Industries), of which 10 out of a projected 600 houses have been built. A number of clan mothers and other traditional authorities, based in the confederacy, along with young leaders, sought to challenge a new reality that would seem to finalize a process of encroachment over one of several contested tracts. They called for an encampment on the land, a call accompanied by intense emotion among Indian people of all political persuasions; and many have responded, including warrior groups from reservations across the Northeast.
SOURCE

I heard the radio plea for help from the clan mothers by web surfing, relatively soon after it occurred. Their calls had the sense of urgency that stopped everything else if it was heard. That link was taken down; however, there’s a lot of video footage here:

The Autonomy & Solidarity website is produced and maintained by a network of anti-capitalists who believe that revolutionary transformation will come from the self organization of workers and oppressed people.

  The government knew that the Douglas Creek Estates (DCE) lands were contested when it allowed them to be sold. If the government had developed a comprehensive land claims settlement process and had negotiated in good faith with Six Nations from the start, this problem would never have taken the form it has.
People from Six Nations occupied the Douglas Creek Estates to stop a housing development from being built on contested land. Now that the situation has been escalated, non-natives on and off the Haldimand tract can best resolve this issue by pressuring the Canadian government to establish a fair and comprehensive settlement of all outstanding land claims with Six Nations.
SOURCE

I heard someone say on a video clip that I can’t find again, “The military took care of THEM then; let the military take care of THEM now,” or words to that effect. His racist remarks reminded me of the signs that used to say No Indians Allowed!

The following is no longer up on the web, either. Therefore, it really wasn’t about stealing land to build a Casino after the attempted encroachment and land theft. The reason I sat that, is companies like Henco use land for sacred or religious purposes.

SOURCE
Court rules in favour of casino project

Last updated Jun 23 2006 01:36 PM MDT
CBC News

A court ruling allows the Stoney Nakoda First Nation to begin construction of a casino and hotel west of Calgary.
The court ruling Wednesday has likely put an end to demonstrations by three elders of the band who claimed they owned the land, which they said was sacred and used for ceremonies.
Construction on the casino and hotel development was supposed to start last summer, but the elder women and their families refused to move for survey and construction workers.

Remember all the debates about NAFTA, the “North American Union,” NASCO, and all that fun stuff?

December 21, 2001
The National Association of Independent Insurers (NAII) is pleased that HR 2299, the Department of Transportation and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2002 recently signed by President Bush provides funding to establish the safety mandates now required for Mexican trucks to roll under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).
SOURCE

Maybe all of that opened a door for Henco to walk onto Six Nations’ Territory.

The agreement will eventually eliminate tariffs currently imposed on US sales in Central America, open up the market for US goods and services and make investment easier.
While it is expected to have limited economic impact for the US, the Bush administration sees the pact as an important element in its mission to spread democracy and combat terror.
Along with the six new nations within Cafta – and the Nafta agreement with Canada and Mexico – the US currently has free-trade agreements with Australia, Chile, Singapore, Jordan and Israel.

SOURCE

To conclude, there’s just one element missing from “Modernized Manifest Destiny” in order for this to be complete: the suppressing and oppressive religious element.

Source

Evangelists divide Huichol communities, cause conflict

Thirteen families have recently moved into Emmanuel after being forcibly run out of the Huichol pueblo of Santa Catarina. Their story is increasingly common across Latin America, where Native pueblos have been targeted for conversion by evangelical sects -and are pushing back with force.

Consisting of a half-dozen small duplexes of brick and yellow stucco, Emmanuel was paid for by state authorities and project residents, with help from a church in nearby Zacatecas. Religious supporters from Minnesota and New York state have come south to help build the cement block church under construction.

The Religious Right, the present generation of philosophical Puritanical descent is still trying to convert, assimilate, and suppress the “savages” and the pagans in my view.
Remind me of the Religious Right’s intentions of philosophical Puritanical descent(Thankyou stormbear).

[Update]

Ontario pulls out of Caledonia talks

A violent confrontation last week in Caledonia, Ont., has prompted the Ontario to pull out of this week’s scheduled negotiations with Six Nations and the federal government.

“Ontario considers last week’s confrontation unacceptable,” Lars Eedy, spokesman for the provincial aboriginal affairs ministry, said Tuesday in a release. “Violence is never a solution to any dispute.”

Developer Sam Gualtieri was hospitalized with face and head injuries Sept. 13 after confronting a group of protesters in one of two houses on the Stirling Street subdivision he is building for his daughters.

I said the following in My Journey To Wounded Knee

I believe this is a core issue of the Siege of Wounded Knee 1973:


Self-defense Summary: Should the law punish those who use force to defend themselves against criminal acts?

To conclude, allow me to explain with an analogy from my personal experience. I had a lawnmower that I was proud of, because I bought it when I first bought my own house. But, one day I heard it being dragged off my back porch after hearing the chain loosened. I put down my book and looked on my back porch; it was gone. I ran to find it, imagining where the thief would have taken it. I found him pulling it in broad daylight down the street, while I was running. Now, I’m not foolish. I looked to see if he had any weapons or anything, deciding I could go for his knees first if he refused to return it. I yelled about 15 yards away from him after looking for possible witnesses, “Hey! You know, it’s funny…that looks exactly like the lawn mower that was just on my back porch.” “Oh, is it?” He said. He continued, “I think it is.” “You don’t mind if I take that back from you, now do you?” I angrily said. “Not at all,” he replied. I said, “I didn’t think so,” while I grabbed it back from him and stomped back home. Funny thing is, the police said I was foolish and they couldn’t do anything, since I got my lawnmower back. Did I have a right to do what I did? What if he had tried to come into my home and I used deadly force? I don’t own a weapon, but the kitchen is very close by.

So, the Neoconservative forces in the U.S. and in Canada who de-affirmed the U.N. Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples severely “mind” when those Indigenous Peoples try to keep the land that was stolen and promised to be returned one aloof day. If they kept their promises today – there wouldn’t be these types of conflicts.

A double standard is operating. When the thirteen “United Colonies” fought for Independence even before the U.S. became a country from Great Britain, it was a fight for Independence, but when Indigenous Peoples fight and strive for theirs…it’s impeding progress, or hubris to that effect. 

I am not making a judgment as to what First Nations should do or should not have done; however, I would like to offer some general information based on some historical analysis. If one warrior had been present at the Sand Creek Massacre, I dare say it would not have been accurately reclassified from a “battle.” Everyone knows that Washita was a massacre; it just hasn’t been reclassified as such. Why? Because of the eleven warriors who defended themselves and their people, who weren’t normally at Black Kettle’s village (as the rationalization seems to go). So, the U.S. government continued to punish commit genocide against the American Indian until the last Massacre at Wounded Knee.

The feelings and actions were totally justified after the Sand Creek Massacre.

Dee Brown. “Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee.” p. 94:

“The white man has taken our country, killed all of our children. Now no peace. We want to go meet our families in the spirit land. We loved the whites until we found out they lied to us, and robbed us of what we had. We have raised the battle ax until death.”(1)

And, one thing they did not have then that is available now is instant communication. There is the internet, there are telephones, there are lobbying groups that lobby for American Indian vital issues. I am not pretending to have the answer, but what I do know are two things.

First, regardless of whether or not peaceful negations were strived for or defensive war was used, they were going to steal the land and exterminate them regardless.  Trusting was a great liability. Also, Geronimo considered surrendering a great mistake. Second, is if the answer is not found and implemented soon and very soon indeed, George W. Bush and the Neoconservative forces in the U.S. and in Canada who de-affirmed the U.N. Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples are going to finish what Custer started in the sacred Black Hills.

When does it end?

“Judge denies Stay”
“Drilling to continue”

Powertech, a Canadian mining company, began drilling uranium exploratory wells in the Dewey Burdock area northwest of Edgemont a few weeks despite the approval of their permit being appealed in court.

Black Hills Announces Additional Texas Pipeline Acquisition

Rapid City, SD – Black Hills Energy, Inc., the integrated energy subsidiary of Black Hills Corporation today announced the purchase of the assets of the Kilgore to Houston Pipeline System from Equilon Pipeline Company, LLC. The pipeline will be operated by the Company’s Houston-based oil pipeline and transportation company, Black Hills Operating Company, LLC, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Black Hills Energy Resources, Inc.

The Kilgore pipeline transports crude oil from the Kilgore, TX region south to Houston, TX, which is the transfer point to connecting carriers via the Oiltanking Houston terminal facilities. The 10-inch pipeline is approximately 190 miles long and has a capacity of approximately 35,000 barrels per day for sweet and 23,000 barrels per day for sour type crude oil. In addition, the Kilgore system has approximately 400,000 barrels of crude oil storage at Kilgore and 375,000 barrels of storage at the Texoma Tank Farm located in Longview, TX. These storage facilities will eventually be interchangeable between the two tank farms.

Project OVERVIEW

The Keystone Oil Pipeline (Keystone) is a proposed 2,969 kilometre (1,845 mile) pipeline with an initial nominal capacity to transport approximately 435,000 barrels per day of crude oil from Hardisty, Alberta, to U.S. Midwest markets at Wood River and Patoka, Illinois.

– snip –

The commercial commitments support the expansion of the Keystone Pipeline to a nominal capacity of approximately 590,000 barrels per day and will involve the construction of a 473-kilometre (294-mile) extension of the U.S. portion of the pipeline from the Nebraska/Kansas border to a hub near Cushing, Oklahoma. The expansion and extension target in-service date is fourth quarter 2010.

The total length of the proposed Keystone Pipeline is 1,845 miles (2,969 kilometres).
o Approximately 1,078 miles (1,735 kilometres) of new pipeline will be constructed in the U.S.
o The Canadian portion of the proposed project includes the construction of approximately 230 miles (370 kilometres) of new pipeline and the conversion of approximately 537 miles (864 kilometres) of existing TransCanada pipeline from natural gas to crude oil transmission.

When does it end?

Add to all of that the fact that theCanadian company has the legal right to condemn land for a crude-oil pipeline through the eastern part of the state (South Dakota in this case) – and presto!

Now you know why the Neoconservative forces in the U.S. and in Canada who de-affirmed the U.N. Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples didn’t want to sign the Declaration.

If I remember correctly, “Vaulting ambition” was Macbeth’s downfall.

Macbeth’s castle. Hautboys and torches.

That tears shall drown the wind. I have no spur

To prick the sides of my intent, but only

Vaulting ambition, which o’erleaps itself

And falls on the other.

Enough said.