This Year, It’s About Saving Lives

On this day last year, I asked for one thing:  GOTV funds for Democratic Indian candidates.

This year, I want something more fundamental.

I want you to help me save some lives.

That is no exaggeration.  Every year, we lose a few more people – mostly elders – because they freeze to death.  The last few winters in South Dakota have been lethal, and this year’s – perhaps as little as a couple of weeks away now – promises to be no exception.  

Last week, navajo kicked off our now-annual fundraiser to provide propane and heaters for people on South Dakota’s Rosebud and Pine Ridge reservations.  I’ve learned of another heater option that’s both safe and less expensive, and is – for the moment – on sale.  Let’s take advantage of it.

First, a disclaimer:  We have no stock in Northern Tool.  I know nothing about the company’s politics.  I only know that we’ve bought household, outdoor, and farm and ranch items from them for years, and their prices have always been more reasonable than most other places.  They were certainly the least expensive place I could find last year as a source for the propane heater we’ve been recommending since that time (that heater and order info are near the end of the diary).  We also just bought the heater I’m about to recommend, so I can attest that it’s sturdy and works well.  Here’s a photo:


Little Buddy Heater

It’s much smaller than the other heater; it has an O2 sensor with automatic shutoff auto-shutoff if it gets knocked over, no tubes, auto-ignition with simple “on” and “off” buttons, and various other safety features.  It’s also advertised as able to heat a 100-square-foot space, which is about five times the size of Wings’s studio.  And the little propane canisters are much cheaper, obviously than filling a tank.  Yes, I realize that it’s undoubtedly more expensive over the long term, but when you’re in a bind and have only a few bucks, being able to buy a canister when you can’t afford to fill a tank could mean the difference between surviving and freezing to death.

This particular model normally sells for $59.99 from this source.  Most other places we looked – even Cabela’s – it was $79.99.  At least through next Tuesday, apparently, there’s an additional $5 off; we got ours for $54.99 plus shipping, which came to $63 and change.  The canisters we already had, but I’m guessing no more than $10 a pop, and St. Francis Energy probably sells them, too.

Order this heater here.  

Additional info needed for shipping is below.

Now, on to your regularly scheduled programming, courtesy of navajo:

HOW YOU CAN HELP

PLEASE Share with family and friends and ask them to share.

My navajo’s earlier diaries explain in more detail why and how we are helping:

Here we go again: Blizzard hits Dakotas

Band-Aid for the Lakotas

Pine Ridge: American Prisoner of War Camp #334

Revealing Pine Ridge Rez Demographic Information


Employment Information
  • Recent reports vary but many point out that the median income on the Pine Ridge Reservation is approximately $2,600 to $3,500 per year.
  • The unemployment rate on Pine Ridge is said to be approximately 83-85% and can be higher during the winter months when travel is difficult or often impossible.

    Note that South Dakota boasts of a 4.5% unemployment rate and ranks #2 in the Nation.
  • According to 2006 resources, about 97% of the population lives below Federal poverty levels.
  • There is little industry, technology, or commercial infrastructure on the Reservation to provide employment.
  • Rapid City, South Dakota is the nearest town of size (population approximately 57,700) for those who can travel to find work.  It is located 120 miles from the Reservation.  The nearest large city to Pine Ridge is Denver, Colorado located some 350 miles away.

We have bypassed the middlemen; the 501c3s, the red-taped strangled Tribal Councils and the pathetic Federal LIHEAP program which runs out three weeks into winter.

We’ve set up relationships with the propane companies that service Rosebud and Pine Ridge reservation. The kind operators/owners know who needs help and can’t get it from their Tribal, State or Federal government.

Help buy propane for Lakota families in South Dakota:

The *fastest* way to help is to pick up the phone and call with your credit card information. A family will get propane delivered either the same day or the next day.


Telephone:

Sherry Cornelius of St. Francis Energy Co.

at  6 0 5 – 7 4 7 – 2 5 4 2

11 AM – 6 PM MST EVERY DAY

Ask for Sherry or her mom Patsy. Normally a minimum order is $150, but they have an account to accumulate small donations to a minimum order. Credit Cards welcome and they are the only Native owned fuel company on Rosebud.  Rosebud is next to Pine Ridge Reservation and in the same economically depressed condition.

If you’d like to mail a check:

[make check payable to: St. Francis Energy Co.]

Attn: Sherry or Patsy

St. Francis Energy Co. / Valandra’s II

P.O. Box 140

St. Francis, South Dakota 57572

NOT tax deductible

http://sfec.yolasite.com/

You can also call Sherry’s cell phone: 605.208.8888 if the above line is busy.

UPDATE:

Good idea from  Aji in the comments :

…for $230 plus shipping, Kossacks can get them an LPG safety space heater.  We’ve used this model; very effective; stable and low for safety and energy efficiency; multiple heat settings so you don’t waste gas; and a built-in O2 sensor auto-shutoff.

You can order a heater  here  and have it shipped to:

Sherry Cornelius

St. Francis Energy Co.

102 N Main Street

SAINT FRANCIS, SD 57572

Mr. Heater Big Buddy™ Indoor/Outdoor Propane Heater – 18,000 BTU, Model# MH18B

You also need to include these accessories:

Mr. Heater AC Power Adapter for Big Buddy Heaters – 6 Volt, Model# F276127

Mr. Heater 12-Ft. Hose with Regulator for Item# 173635

Mr. Heater Fuel Filter for Buddy™ Heaters, Model# F273699

Order Total   $225.85 (includes shipping)

Telephone:

The Lakota Plains Propane Company

at  6 0 5 – 8 6 7 – 5 1 9 9

Monday- Friday only 8-4:30pm MST

Ask for Crystal to contribute to someone from Autumn’s list. $120 minimum delivery. This company serves Pine Ridge Reservation.

NOT tax deductible

If you live out of the country please use our PayPal link at Native American Netroots, the donate button is in the upper right of the page. This process takes about two weeks for the funds to hit the reservations so telephoning the propane companies directly is the fastest way to help.

Native American Netroots Web Badge

 An ongoing series sponsored by the Native American Netroots team focusing on the current issues faced by American Indian Tribes and current solutions to those issues.

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Tonight! “Hidden America: Children of the Plains,” ABC 20/20 Special

TONIGHT, at 10 PM Eastern, ABC is airing a 20/20 special called “Hidden America: Children of the Plains” featuring Tashina Iron Horse, a 5 year old from Pine Ridge Reservation.


Tashina Iron Horse

       Young Tashina Iron Horse is a competitive pow wow dancer. (credit: Elissa Stohler/ABC News)

Pine Ridge residents live amid poverty that rivals that of the third world. Forty-seven percent of the Pine Ridge population lives below the federal poverty level, 65 percent to 80 percent of the adults are unemployed, and rampant alcoholism and an obesity epidemic combine with underfunded schools to make it a rough place to grow up. Tashina lives in government housing in Manderson, 30 minutes north of downtown Pine Ridge. She lives with her grandmother, parents, siblings and uncles – sometimes up to 19 people live in the three-bedroom house, which has seen better days.

In the decades following President John F. Kennedy’s pledge to fund public housing projects on American Indian reservations, a construction boom began in Pine Ridge. Today, most of these units built in the 1970s and 1980s are in varying degrees of disrepair – a result, critics say, of steep cuts to the Housing and Urban Development budget made by President Ronald Reagan in the 1980s. Public housing dollars today are largely spent battling black mold in reservation housing rather than constructing new homes.

Amid the despair, there are youth across the reservation – like Tashina – who are breaking through the hopelessness with huge dreams and powerful stories.

Check out a sneak peek – Tashina teaches Diane Sawyer some of her moves – below.

[Video will not post here. Click at ABC link at top to view video.]

Video Transcript provided by the lovely Cedwyn:

ABC:  At one of the dance competitions, we saw little Tashina Iron Horse, so joyful.  We were intrigued by her life.

(cut to house)

Tashina:  See, mom!  I got that book.

ABC:  Her house has so many people living in it, even her grandmother and uncle find it hard to keep track.

Grandma:  Five in Bobby’s room, two in mine, and the two boys downstairs.  And then Amy and her family, there’s five of them.  Then Amber, her and Baby will be coming back, too, so there’s two, three of them.

ABC:  So in total, it’s about, what, 15?

Aunt:  Yeah.  Gee, 19, I guess.

ABC:  Tashina sleeps in one bed with her mother, her father and two other children.

AJ:  Comb your hair and look into the camera.

ABC:  Tashina’s dad, AJ, is getting ready to apply to be a firefighter.  He gets little Tashina and her sister Shante ready for school.

AJ:  If there was enough housings for us, I think we would get our own house just so me and my little family could have our time.

ABC:  And it’s her uncle Matthew who makes those intricate little costumes Tashina loves to wear for the dances.  This is beautiful.

Tashina, five years old, with a giggling invitation to join her in the dance.

Please watch the special tonight and let us know what you think in the comments.

We at Native American Netroots thought this would be a good time to kick off our winter fuel fundraising efforts.

Here are a few photos of the grateful recipients of the fuel you bought last winter that I haven’t posted before:

These photos were all taken by Sherry Cornelius aka lpggirl of St. Francis Energy who personally delivers the propane. Everyone pictured is saying THANKS to Daily Kos for helping them with heat.

_________________________________________________________

HOW YOU CAN HELP

_________________________________________________________

PLEASE Share with family and friends and ask them to share.

_________________________________________________________

My earlier diaries explain in more detail why and how we are helping:

Here we go again: Blizzard hits Dakotas

Band-Aid for the Lakotas

Pine Ridge: American Prisoner of War Camp #334

Revealing Pine Ridge Rez Demographic Information


Employment Information
  • Recent reports vary but many point out that the median income on the Pine Ridge Reservation is approximately $2,600 to $3,500 per year.
  • The unemployment rate on Pine Ridge is said to be approximately 83-85% and can be higher during the winter months when travel is difficult or often impossible.

    Note that South Dakota boasts of a 4.5% unemployment rate and ranks #2 in the Nation.
  • According to 2006 resources, about 97% of the population lives below Federal poverty levels.
  • There is little industry, technology, or commercial infrastructure on the Reservation to provide employment.
  • Rapid City, South Dakota is the nearest town of size (population approximately 57,700) for those who can travel to find work.  It is located 120 miles from the Reservation.  The nearest large city to Pine Ridge is Denver, Colorado located some 350 miles away.

We have bypassed the middlemen; the 501c3s, the red-taped strangled Tribal Councils and the pathetic Federal LIHEAP program which runs out three weeks into winter.

We’ve set up relationships with the propane companies that service Rosebud and Pine Ridge reservation. The kind operators/owners know who needs help and can’t get it from their Tribal, State or Federal government.

Help buy propane for Lakota families in South Dakota:

The *fastest* way to help is to pick up the phone and call with your credit card information. A family will get propane delivered either the same day or the next day.


Telephone:

Sherry Cornelius of St. Francis Energy Co.

at  6 0 5 – 7 4 7 – 2 5 4 2

11 AM – 6 PM MST EVERY DAY

Ask for Sherry or her mom Patsy. Normally a minimum order is $150, but they have an account to accumulate small donations to a minimum order. Credit Cards welcome and they are the only Native owned fuel company on Rosebud.  Rosebud is next to Pine Ridge Reservation and in the same economically depressed condition.

If you’d like to mail a check:

[make check payable to: St. Francis Energy Co.]

Attn: Sherry or Patsy

St. Francis Energy Co. / Valandra’s II

P.O. Box 140

St. Francis, South Dakota 57572

NOT tax deductible

http://sfec.yolasite.com/

 

You can also call Sherry’s cell phone: 605.208.8888 if the above line is busy.

_____________________________________________

UPDATE:

Good idea from  Aji in the comments :

…for $230 plus shipping, Kossacks can get them an LPG safety space heater.  We’ve used this model; very effective; stable and low for safety and energy efficiency; multiple heat settings so you don’t waste gas; and a built-in O2 sensor auto-shutoff.

You can order a heater  here  and have it shipped to:

Sherry Cornelius

St. Francis Energy Co.

102 N Main Street

SAINT FRANCIS, SD 57572

Mr. Heater Big Buddy™ Indoor/Outdoor Propane Heater – 18,000 BTU, Model# MH18B

You also need to include these accessories:

Mr. Heater AC Power Adapter for Big Buddy Heaters – 6 Volt, Model# F276127

Mr. Heater 12-Ft. Hose with Regulator for Item# 173635

Mr. Heater Fuel Filter for Buddy™ Heaters, Model# F273699

Order Total   $222.84 (includes shipping)

Telephone:

The Lakota Plains Propane Company

at  6 0 5 – 8 6 7 – 5 1 9 9

Monday- Friday only 8-4:30pm MST

Ask for Crystal to contribute to someone from Autumn’s list. $120 minimum delivery. This company serves Pine Ridge Reservation.

NOT tax deductible

If you live out of the country please use our PayPal link at Native American Netroots, the donate button is in the upper right of the page. This process takes about two weeks for the funds to hit the reservations so telephoning the propane companies directly is the fastest way to help.

A special thanks to Miep who recently donated $500 to this season’s effort.

Pine Ridge Poster Project Up & Running [Photo Heavy]

Aaron Huey‘s awareness campaign bringing attention to the on going struggle of broken treaties with American Indians is surfacing in Seattle and New York City.  

I’ve collected photos from his Honor the Treaties Facebook Page for you to see the progress. If you have a Facebook account please go there and “like” it.

The installations use the following works of art from Shepard Fairey and his assistant Ernesto Yerena, these screen prints are based on Aaron Huey’s photos of Pine Ridge.

LEARN ABOUT THE HISTORY OF BROKEN PROMISES

The photos of the poster installations are below the fold.

LIVE IN SEATTLE

Pine Ridge Poster Project

Capitol Hill, Seattle

Pine Ridge Poster Project

West Seattle

Pine Ridge Poster Project

At the Georgetown Carnival in Seattle

Pine Ridge Poster Project

3rd Ave S & Main, Downtown Seattle

Pine Ridge Poster Project

200 S. Main St., Seattle

Pine Ridge Poster Project

7th Ave S and S Jackson St., Seattle

Pine Ridge Poster Project

Seattle

Pine Ridge Poster Project

Oregon & Rainier Ave., Seattle

Pine Ridge Poster Project

12th & First, Seattle

IMG_2538IMG_2538IMG_2538IMG_2538IMG_2538IMG_2538IMG_2538

LIVE IN NEW YORK CITY

Pine Ridge Poster Project

29th St between 6th and 7th Ave in NYC

Pine Ridge Poster Project

E 33rd and Madison Ave, MANHATTAN

Pine Ridge Poster Project

Mulberry & Houston, Manhattan

Pine Ridge Poster Project

3rd Ave and E 22nd, MANHATTAN

NYC map

Clicking on the map gives you the street addresses. It would be great if we could get more photos of these installations. Send me a PM if you can take photos for us and post them on the Honor the Treaties Facebook Page.

I’m currently putting together a team to do some “wheat pasting” in San Francisco.

ACTION!

Do you have a prominent wall that gets a lot of traffic in your city and could use some wheat pasting?  Tell us in the comments.

Pine Ridge Poster Project

Treaty Holders


LEARN ABOUT THE HISTORY OF BROKEN PROMISES

Article VI, Clause 2 of the United States Constitution, known as the Supremacy Clause, establishes the U.S. Constitution, U.S. Treaties, and Federal Statutes as “the supreme law of the land.”   We start from the base assumption that few, if any, treaties between the United States and North American Tribes were honored.  The TED talk above outlines one particular case that stands as a symbol for all tribes:  The United States v. Sioux Nation of Indians.  In this history we see a calculated and systematic destruction of a people.  Although the story is of the Lakota and the treaties they signed at Fort Laramie in 1851 and 1868, it is the story of all indigenous people.  The story of this tribe is far from over and “The Black Hills are (still) not for sale.”  Over time this site will grow to become a more complete database of treaties and the treaty issues facing North America Indian tribes.  For more information on contemporary advocacy for Lakota treaty rights, please visit www.oweakuinternational.org

Honor The Treaties

Ernesto Yerena’s Newest Addition to the Pine Ridge Billboard Project

This is part three of my continuing coverage of Aaron Huey’s Pine Ridge Billboard Project.

Below is Ernesto Yerena’s latest screenprint made for this project and based on one of Aaron Huey’s images from Pine Ridge. Information about Ernesto and his first illustration for this project is featured below the fold.

I’m truly amazed at the magnitude of beauty in this artistic collaboration among Aaron Huey, Shepard Fairey and Ernesto Yerena.  

Art and Activism.

Background on this project below:

The famous street artist Shepard Fairey of the Obama HOPE image has generously donated his time. This will be available as a limited edition signed screenprint through Aaron Huey’s Pine Ridge Billboard Project.

BEHOLD

Here is Aaron Huey’s photo that Shepard Fairey based his illustration on:

Theo White Plume - Wambli Wahancanka

      Theo White Plume – Wambli Wahancanka (Eagle Shield)

FROM MY FIRST DIARY ON THIS SUBJECT:

I would like to announce a new project to raise NATIONAL awareness of the poverty on our reservations. My friend Aaron Huey is launching an ambitious billboard campaign using his images of Pine Ridge reservation. Aaron is donating his time and talent to organize this project.

I have been documenting the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation for the past six years. Recently I have realized how inappropriate it is for this project to end with another book or a gallery show.

More than any project I have done in my career, the ever-evolving Pine Ridge project gives voice to social injustice and a forgotten history. I want my work to empower the Lakota and other tribes who fight for recognition of the past in order to help give them a chance to move forward.

Your involvement will help raise the visibility of these images by taking them straight to the public to the sides of busses, subway tunnels, and billboards. I want people to think about prisoner of war camps in America on their commute to work. I want the message to be so loud that it cannot be ignored.

Honor the Treaties

Illustration by Ernesto Yerena using images by Aaron Huey


Lakota Girl Reaching

Image used to create the illustration above


Transcript:

[American Indian voice: Rick Two Dogs]

You know, history, when you break it down it means “his story,” which is really the story of the dominant culture.  And we all know historically that the — I guess the conquerors are the ones that write the history, you know, and it’s really never based on the people that were supposedly conquered.

[Text block]

The last chapter in any successful genocide is the one in which the oppressor can remove their hands and say, “My god, what are these people doing to themselves, they are killing each other, they are killing themselves!”

[Aaron Huey:]

When I first got to Pine Ridge, I didn’t really get it.  All my first assignments were about poverty and violence and gangs and all those stories skimmed the surface.  And now, six years later, now that I know the real story, I realize that mainstream American magazines won’t print it.

The real story is the history — a history of broken treaties, of prisoner of war camps, and massacres.  It’s too hard to look at.  It’s too dark.  It’s too layered and too painful to fit in between shampoo ads and car commercials.  This project has reached the limits of print media.

I don’t want you to give me money today for a book or a gallery show, where everybody drinks wine and looks at beautiful pictures of suffering.  I want to take the images I’ve made over the past six years on Pine Ridge and put them on billboards.  I want to put them in subways.  I want to put them on the sides of busses.  I want to put them in places where people can’t ignore them.

I’m here today asking for your participation in a project that will illuminate a hidden history and empower a community.  This is a grassroots information campaign.  Your involvement, not just your money, is crucial.  We will need help distributing these images in your communities.

Several partners have already joined me in this cause, including Ernesto Yerena, an activist and artist from Los Angeles who created visuals for the Alto Arizona campaign.  Ernesto is collaborating with me to create a poster series based on my photographs that transcends these depressing statistics.



This collaborative image is the first of many that we will make in February.  Also joining us will be Shephard Fairey, the most prolific street artist working in America, widely known for his ongoing Obey propaganda and Obama’s Hope campaign.  If anybody can raise an issue to icon status, it’s him.

My collaborations with Ernesto and Shephard will go up on walls in cities all across America.  We will be working hand in hand with Lakota and other indigenous rights organizations to produce this work, sharing resources through a website I have created at honorthetreaties.org.

Remember, this project is not a charity.  It’s about turning awareness into action.

MORE BACKGROUND:

In 1980 the Supreme Court ruled upon the longest running court case in US History, the Sioux Nation vs. the United States. The court determined that the terms of the 1868 Fort Laramie Treaty had been violated when the Sioux were resettled onto P.O.W. camps, and 7 million acres of their land were opened up to prospectors and homesteaders. These camps are now called reservations.

The grim statistics on Native Reservations today are the equivalent to that of a 3rd world country, revealing the legacy of colonization and treaty violations. Unemployment on the Reservation fluctuates between 80-90%. Many are homeless, and those with homes are packed into rotting buildings with up to 5 families. More than 90% of the population lives below the federal poverty line. The life expectancy for men is 47 years old – roughly the same as Afghanistan and Somalia.

ACTION: For as little as $10 you can help launch this project.

Your involvement will help raise the visibility of these images by taking them straight to the public to the sides of busses, subway tunnels, and billboards. I want people to think about prisoner of war camps in America on their commute to work. I want the message to be so loud that it cannot be ignored.



Mock-up of a highway billboard installation:




Mock-up of a wall installation using 24x 26″ posters:

Mock-up of a subway platform installation:

For the minimum donation of $10 you get access to the “making-of zone.” The making-of zone will be a special behind the scenes page where you can monitor Aaron, Ernesto, Shepard and others as they work on this project.

CREATIVE PARTNERS: Helping me to turn my photos into powerful illustrations are Ernesto Yerena, an artist and activist who created visuals for the Alto Arizona campaign, and Shepard Fairey, the most prolific street artist in America, known for his street art (OBEY) and the Obama HOPE campaign image. These collaborations with Ernesto and Shepard will go up on buildings and bus stops all over the country. I hope to also involve some of you with distribution of imagery and possibly even in the role of a wheat pasting in your towns. Shepardard’s image will be uploaded in April.

FINANCIAL GOALS + BUDGET: $17,250 will provide funding for a nationwide guerilla poster campaign. $30k, will allow for substantially more visibility, taking the photo essay to subway platforms in NYC and to billboards around South Dakota and Washington DC, where policy makers have the power to make real change on Reservations. Expenses: 35-40% to printing posters and billboards, 40-50% for ad space, 5-10% Shipping and Travel, and 1% for website setup.

Progress so far today:

Remember that $17,250 is the minimum goal, the ultimate goal is $30K to allow more visibility.

PLEASE TAKE A FEW MINUTES to watch my TED talk on this subject, the video is posted below.

Transcript

Honor The Treaties

TURN AWARENESS INTO ACTION:

Through this campaign a website is forming at honorthetreaties.org I hope to build this site up to become a point of reference for those who want to know more about the history and the (broken) treaties of the Sioux and other tribes. There will be direct links to assist grassroots Native non-profits in places like Pine Ridge.

Our first partner is Owe Aku.

Support the Owe Aku International Justice Project,  a grassroots non-governmental social change organization dedicated to the preservation and revitalization of the Lakota Way of Life, 1851 & 1868 Ft. Laramie Treaty Rights, and Human Rights.  “Owe Aku” means “bring back the way.”  Learn more about their specific actions at oweakuinternational.org There is also a donation page if you’d like to help this group. They are currently in need of a new computer for their office.

Raising the NATIONAL awareness in metropolitan areas like New York City and Washington DC will help us influence policy makers to help our American Indian tribes and reservations.

This is an excellent campaign.

AWARENESS WILL BRING ACTION

FOR FUTURE REFERENCE:

Contact info for the SENATE INDIAN AFFAIRS COMMITTEE

to honor the treaties:

Senator Dorgan

Senator Barrasso

Senator Akaka

Senator Cantwell

Senator Coburn

Senator Crapo

Senator Franken

Senator Inouye

Senator Johanns

Senator Johnson

Senator McCain

Senator Murkowski

Senator Tester

Senator Udall

Rosebud Rezident Receives a New Propane Heater from Kossack

In my last diary Sherry Cornelius aka lpggirl of St. Francis Energy told us about Lillian Walking Eagle who desperately needed a new propane heater:

Lillian Walking Eagle and grand daughter : Lillian’s son Cornell said to put the caption “These two old ladies nearly froze.”  they have an old faulty ummm lpg space heater? not sure what they’re called.  housing is constantly being called by them and housing merely replaces the thermocouple.  i thought i heard liep had funds for furnaces so i told lillian about it.  i told my mom about lillian’s situation, and she called the VP willie kindle.  he said he would do something for this gramma.  wks later nothing is done for them.

Kossack kurt, a lurker, my new favorite lurker ordered a heater plus all the necessary accessories and had it shipped to Sherry. Sherry installed it right away.

Here is Lillian with her brand new heater:

Lorikeet, lineatus, RunawayRose and jessica (?) also donated money specifically for heaters. I waited to hear from Sherry to make sure the heaters were safe and the proper accessories were included.  An update on cost, thanks to kurt, is that plus the accessories and shipping the total cost for each heater is $230. I was able to buy 2 more heaters.  Sherry promised to take photos of the new heaters with their new owners.

lpggirl has sent us more photos of our Rosebud rezidents saying THANK YOU to you all for helping them get through another harsh winter in South Dakota.

Below you’ll find more THANK YOU photos and details on how you can help. Please share these donation details with family and friends.

Again, we are helping people who are falling through the cracks with government and tribal assistance.

Everyone here has consented to having their photo taken with the caption

THANK YOU DAILY KOS and Native American Netroots!

More from Sherry’s email:


thanks a bunch to the quilt making lady.  the question was asked, who are those for? i said anybody that needs them. then they were gone. they asked who made these. i read them the note that came with, then gave them the note.  i’m sure there will be a thank you note to follow…

:)

_________________________________________________________

HOW YOU CAN HELP

_________________________________________________________

PLEASE Share with family and friends and ask them to share.

_________________________________________________________

My earlier diaries explain in more detail why and how we are helping:

Here we go again: Blizzard hits Dakotas

Band-Aid for the Lakotas

Pine Ridge: American Prisoner of War Camp #334

Revealing Pine Ridge Rez Demographic Information

Employment Information
  • Recent reports vary but many point out that the median income on the Pine Ridge Reservation is approximately $2,600 to $3,500 per year.
  • The unemployment rate on Pine Ridge is said to be approximately 83-85% and can be higher during the winter months when travel is difficult or often impossible.

    Note that South Dakota boasts of a 4.5% unemployment rate and ranks #2 in the Nation.
  • According to 2006 resources, about 97% of the population lives below Federal poverty levels.
  • There is little industry, technology, or commercial infrastructure on the Reservation to provide employment.
  • Rapid City, South Dakota is the nearest town of size (population approximately 57,700) for those who can travel to find work.  It is located 120 miles from the Reservation.  The nearest large city to Pine Ridge is Denver, Colorado located some 350 miles away.

We have bypassed the middlemen; the 501c3s, the red-taped strangled Tribal Councils and the pathetic Federal LIHEAP program which runs out three weeks into winter.

We’ve set up relationships with the propane companies that service Rosebud and Pine Ridge reservation. The kind operators/owners know who needs help and can’t get it from their Tribal, State or Federal government.

Help buy propane for Lakota families in South Dakota:

The *fastest* way to help is to pick up the phone and call with your credit card information. A family will get propane delivered either the same day or the next day.


Telephone:

Sherry Cornelius of St. Francis Energy Co.

at  6 0 5 – 7 4 7 – 2 5 4 2

11 AM – 6 PM MST EVERY DAY

Ask for Sherry or her mom Patsy. Normally a minimum order is $150, but they have an account to accumulate small donations to a minimum order. Credit Cards welcome and they are the only Native owned fuel company on Rosebud.  Rosebud is next to Pine Ridge Reservation and in the same economically depressed condition.

If you’d like to mail a check:

[make check payable to: St. Francis Energy Co.]

Attn: Sherry or Patsy

St. Francis Energy Co. / Valandra’s II

P.O. Box 140

St. Francis, South Dakota 57572

NOT tax deductible

http://sfec.yolasite.com/

 

You can also call Sherry’s cell phone: 605.208.8888 if the above line is busy.

_____________________________________________

UPDATE:

Good idea from  Aji in the comments :

…for $230 plus shipping, Kossacks can get them an LPG safety space heater.  We’ve used this model; very effective; stable and low for safety and energy efficiency; multiple heat settings so you don’t waste gas; and a built-in O2 sensor auto-shutoff.

You can order a heater  here  and have it shipped to:

Sherry Cornelius

St. Francis Energy Co.

102 N Main Street

SAINT FRANCIS, SD 57572

Mr. Heater Big Buddy™ Indoor/Outdoor Propane Heater – 18,000 BTU, Model# MH18B

You also need to include these accessories:

Mr. Heater AC Power Adapter for Big Buddy Heaters – 6 Volt, Model# F276127

Mr. Heater 12-Ft. Hose with Regulator for Item# 173635

Mr. Heater Fuel Filter for Buddy™ Heaters, Model# F273699

Order Total   $222.84 (includes shipping)

Telephone:

The Lakota Plains Propane Company

at  6 0 5 – 8 6 7 – 5 1 9 9

Monday- Friday only 8-4:30pm MST

Ask for Crystal to contribute to someone from Autumn’s list. $120 minimum delivery. This company serves Pine Ridge Reservation.

NOT tax deductible

If you live out of the country please use our PayPal link at Native American Netroots, the donate button is in the upper right of the page. This process takes about two weeks for the funds to hit the reservations so telephoning the propane companies directly is the fastest way to help.

Pine Ridge Billboard Project by Aaron Huey

I would like to announce a new project to raise NATIONAL awareness of the poverty on our reservations. My friend Aaron Huey is launching an ambitious billboard campaign using his images of Pine Ridge reservation. Aaron is donating his time and talent to organize this project.

I have been documenting the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation for the past six years. Recently I have realized how inappropriate it is for this project to end with another book or a gallery show.

More than any project I have done in my career, the ever-evolving Pine Ridge project gives voice to social injustice and a forgotten history. I want my work to empower the Lakota and other tribes who fight for recognition of the past in order to help give them a chance to move forward.

Your involvement will help raise the visibility of these images by taking them straight to the public to the sides of busses, subway tunnels, and billboards. I want people to think about prisoner of war camps in America on their commute to work. I want the message to be so loud that it cannot be ignored.


Honor the Treaties

Illustration by Ernesto Yerena using images by Aaron Huey

Lakota Girl Reaching

Image used to create the illustration above


Transcript:

[American Indian voice:]

You know, history, when you break it down it means “his story,” which is really the story of the dominant culture.  And we all know historically that the — I guess the conquerors are the ones that write the history, you know, and it’s really never based on the people that were supposedly conquered.

[Text block]

The last chapter in any successful genocide is the one in which the oppressor can remove their hands and say, “My god, what are these people doing to themselves, they are killing each other, they are killing themselves!”

[Aaron Huey:]

When I first got to Pine Ridge, I didn’t really get it.  All my first assignments were about poverty and violence and gangs and all those stories skimmed the surface.  And now, six years later, now that I know the real story, I realize that mainstream American magazines won’t print it.

The real story is the history — a history of broken treaties, of prisoner of war camps, and massacres.  It’s too hard to look at.  It’s too dark.  It’s too layered and too painful to fit in between shampoo ads and car commercials.  This project has reached the limits of print media.

I don’t want you to give me money today for a book or a gallery show, where everybody drinks wine and looks at beautiful pictures of suffering.  I want to take the images I’ve made over the past six years on Pine Ridge and put them on billboards.  I want to put them in subways.  I want to put them on the sides of busses.  I want to put them in places where people can’t ignore them.

I’m here today asking for your participation in a project that will illuminate a hidden history and empower a community.  This is a grassroots information campaign.  Your involvement, not just your money, is crucial.  We will need help distributing these images in your communities.

Several partners have already joined me in this cause, including Ernesto Yerena, an activist and artist from Los Angeles who created visuals for the Alto Arizona campaign.  Ernesto is collaborating with me to create a poster series based on my photographs that transcends these depressing statistics.



This collaborative image is the first of many that we will make in February.  Also joining us will be Shephard Fairey, the most prolific street artist working in America, widely known for his ongoing Obey propaganda and Obama’s Hope campaign.  If anybody can raise an issue to icon status, it’s him.

My collaborations with Ernesto and Shephard will go up on walls in cities all America.  We will be working hand in hand with Lakota and other indigenous rights organizations to produce this work, sharing resources through a website I have created at honorthetreaties.org.

Remember, this project is not a charity.  It’s about turning awareness into action.

MORE BACKGROUND:

In 1890 the Supreme Court ruled upon the longest running court case in US History, the Sioux Nation vs. the United States. The court determined that the terms of the 1868 Fort Laramie Treaty had been violated when the Sioux were resettled onto P.O.W. camps, and 7 million acres of their land were opened up to prospectors and homesteaders. These camps are now called “reservations”.

The grim statistics on Native Reservations today are the equivalent to that of a 3rd world country, revealing the legacy of colonization and treaty violations. Unemployment on the Reservation fluctuates between 80-90%. Many are homeless, and those with homes are packed into rotting buildings with up to 5 families. More than 90% of the population lives below the federal poverty line. The life expectancy for men is 47 years old – roughly the same as Afghanistan and Somalia.

ACTION: For as little as $10 you can help launch this project.

Your involvement will help raise the visibility of these images by taking them straight to the public-to the sides of busses, subway tunnels, and billboards. I want people to think about prisoner of war camps in America on their commute to work. I want the message to be so loud that it cannot be ignored.



Mock-up of a highway billboard installation:




Mock-up of a wall installation using 24x 26″ posters:

Mock-up of a subway platform installation:

CREATIVE PARTNERS: Helping me to turn my photos into powerful illustrations are Ernesto Yerena, an artist and activist who created visuals for the Alto Arizona campaign, and Shepard Fairey, the most prolific street artist in America, known for his street art (OBEY) and the Obama HOPE campaign image. These collaborations with Ernesto and Shepard will go up on buildings and bus stops all over the country. I hope to also involve some of you with distribution of imagery and possibly even in the role of “wheat pasting” in your towns. Shepard’s image will be uploaded in late Feb.

FINANCIAL GOALS + BUDGET: $17,250 will provide funding for a nationwide guerilla poster campaign. $30k, will allow for substantially more visibility, taking the photo essay to subway platforms in NYC and to billboards around South Dakota and Washington DC, where policy makers have the power to make real change on Reservations. Expenses: 35-40% to printing posters and billboards, 40-50% for ad space, 5-10% Shipping and Travel, and 1% for website setup.

OUTLETS FOR ACTION: Through this campaign a website is forming at honorthetreaties.org I hope to build this site up to become a point of reference for those who want to know more about the history and the (broken) treaties of the Sioux and other tribes. There will be direct links to assist grassroots Native non-profits in places like Pine Ridge.

Our first partner is Owe Aku.

PLEASE TAKE A FEW MINUTES to watch my TED talk on this subject, the video is posted below.

Transcript

Honor The Treaties

Raising the NATIONAL awareness in metropolitan areas like New York City and Washington DC will help us influence policy makers to help our American Indian tribes and reservations.

This is an excellent campaign.

FOR FUTURE REFERENCE:

Contact info for the SENATE INDIAN AFFAIRS COMMITTEE

to honor the treaties:

Senator Dorgan

Senator Barrasso

Senator Akaka

Senator Cantwell

Senator Coburn

Senator Crapo

Senator Franken

Senator Inouye

Senator Johanns

Senator Johnson

Senator McCain

Senator Murkowski

Senator Tester

Senator Udall

SPECIAL THANKS TO:

Cedwyn for providing the video transcript this morning

TiaRachel for video embed assistance

rfall for helping with new coding issues with DK4 stylesheets

Action Alert Update- Lakota Elders Organize Takeover of Elderly Meals Center

( – promoted by navajo)

To live on the Pine Ridge reservation and make it past fifty is beating the odds for life expectancy there. But to be snubbed by your tribal council when you ask for a safe and clean place to eat and then to be targeted for retaliation by the council is beyond comprehension. That’s what is happening at the Porcupine Elderly Meals Center, Pine Ridge, South Dakota. The elders have have taken over occupation of the center and are not leaving until their voices have been heard and action has been taken.

After four years of abuses and calls for remedy from the Bureau of Indian

Affairs(BIA) Oglala Tribal Government, Lakota elders with support from

the Strong Heart Warrior Society, United Urban Warrior Society, and

Rapid City AIM- Grassroots have peacefully taken over, and now occupy,

the Elderly Meals Building in the Porcupine Community of Pine Ridge

Reservation.

This news release best describes the atrocities that have driven the elders to convene this occupation of the Porcupine Elderly Meals Building.

In virtually any other U.S. community, physical abuse of elders, the false arrest and persecution of the elderly by police, the forced evictions of elders in the middle of the winter, and the illegal selling of drugs and alcohol by staff of an elderly meals center would be headline news. But not if the community is the Oglala Pine Ridge Reservation, and the people are the poor and traditional Lakota oyate.

“The former president and the cook have discriminated against the elders at the Porcupine Elderly Meals Center. Elders are demanding them to be removed immediately.

   “The Elders will be leading this occupation with the support and protection of three warrior societies – the Strong Heart Warrior Society, United Urban Warrior Society, and Grassroots AIM.

   “I, Enoch Brings Plenty, as president of the Meals for the Elderly Program at Porcupine, will try my best to please the Elders in my district as best as I can -to bring back honesty, trust and integrity. This is why these three warrior societies are here with us. They are going to teach our children how to protect and remain free with the elders of our oyate. Hoka hey!”

Audio interviews with various organizers of the takeover, and the elders, are here.

Cante Tenza Okolakiciye (Strongheart Warrior Society) can be followed on Twitter @CanteTenza

The hash tags used recently have been #Lakota #Elders #PineRidge

It may be the weekend but messages, emails, letters, faxes can still be effective.

South Dakota Senator Tim Johnson sits on the Senate Indian Affairs Committee.

Contact Info:

@SenJohnsonSD

Phone: (202) 224-5842

Fax: (202) 228-5765

U.S. Department of Justice Office of Tribal Justice

950 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW

Washington, DC 20530-0001

202-514-2000

UPDATE:

ACTION ALERT: URGENT SOLIDARITY SUPPORT NEEDED FOR ELDER’S OCCUPATION OF PORCUPINE ELDERLY MEALS BUILDING

Despite the promises of President Steele and Vice President Poor Bear – we need you to keep calling them and letting them know people are watching and expecting them to keep their word. Tell them you support all the occupation demands including the construction of a new sanitary, elderly building and a full investigation into corruption no matter where it leads.    President  John Yellow Bird Steele    (605) 441-6350     Vice-President Thomas Poor Bear    (605) 441-6365     You can also try to reach them at (605) 867-5821 extension 268 via tribal council secretary Rhonda      Two Eagle. Send council emails through Rhonda at: Rhonda@oglala.org



emphasis mine

More Thank You Pics from Rosebud Rez from our Propane Donation Drive

Sherry Cornelius aka lpggirl of St. Francis Energy has sent us more photos of our Rosebud rezidents saying *THANK YOU* to you all for helping them get through another harsh winter in South Dakota.

Below you’ll find more THANK YOU photos and details on how you can help. Please share these donation details with family and friends.

Again, we are helping people who are falling through the cracks with government and tribal assistance.

Everyone here has consented to having their photo taken with the caption

THANK YOU DAILY KOS and Native American Netroots !








Sherry aka lpggirl had commentary to go with some of her pics. I’ll blockquote her comment with each pic.

Lillian  Walking Eagle and grand daughter : Lillian’s son Cornell said to put the caption “These two old ladies nearly froze.”  they have an old faulty ummm lpg space heater? not sure what they’re called.  housing is constantly being called by them and housing merely replaces the thermocouple.  i thought i heard liep had funds for furnaces so i told lillian about it.  i told my mom about lillian’s situation, and she called the VP willie kindle.  he said he would do something for this gramma.  wks later nothing is done for them.

there are 3 pics for the one house in mm (marshmellow housing) in rosebud; the mom, the dad, and the daughter.  i have never heard a “WHOO-HOO! We have hot water!” before, when you hear the magical sound of the water heater firing up.  and “Does this mean we don’t have to use this little electric heater?” sitting in the corner adjacent to the non-working wood stove (not pictured).  Giant hugs to you all from this family – all of them.





More from Sherry aka lpggirl:

the story behind the dangling lite fixture.  a few years ago when i first delivered lpg to faye blk bear out in corn creek, she was completely out of lpg so i had to do a leak check.  this requires that i go into the house.  that’s when i noticed the broken lite fixture.  when i got back to sf i told my mom of this. she called amos, the director of the housing authority, and the council rep for that community at that time.  i called the housing maintenance department and told them.  i also told an acquaintance, jodi (wife of rodney bordeaux), about this gramma’s broken lite fixture.  they all said they would do something.  years later still nothing has been done about it.

Dangling Light Fixture

the houses that all look alike ranch style, split-level, apts, duplexes; they’re all built and maintained by the rosebud housing authority (HUD houses i guess).  i think most were built in the 60’s.  i’ve noticed that most houses have elec cook stoves, and lpg water heaters and furnaces. some have working wood stoves.  i think a lot of people are using liep to pay for their electricity so when they run out of lpg they use a wood stove, if they have one, or heat the house with the elec. cooking stove and elec. heaters.


earlier this week when it was like 40 below.  i got “brain-freeze” a few times.  the only skin i had exposed was a strip right across my eyes (i forgot my shades that day, but definitely remembered them the next day!).  that was just a tad bit too cold that day.  first time i got brain freeze without eating or drinking anything cold.

it’s been snowing here all day long. [February 6, 2011]  the calm before the storm.  as soon as the winds pick up, here we go – instant ground blizzard. the weather says there’s two storms coming this week.  one tomorrow and one later in the week.

~only a couple more months left of this lovely weather~

sherry

_________________________________________________________

PLEASE Share with family and friends and ask them to share.

_________________________________________________________

My earlier diaries explain in more detail why and how we are helping:

Here we go again: Blizzard hits Dakotas

Band-Aid for the Lakotas

Pine Ridge: American Prisoner of War Camp #334

Revealing Pine Ridge Rez Demographic Information

Employment Information
  • Recent reports vary but many point out that the median income on the Pine Ridge Reservation is approximately $2,600 to $3,500 per year.
  • The unemployment rate on Pine Ridge is said to be approximately 83-85% and can be higher during the winter months when travel is difficult or often impossible.

    Note that South Dakota boasts of a 4.5% unemployment rate and ranks #2 in the Nation.
  • According to 2006 resources, about 97% of the population lives below Federal poverty levels.
  • There is little industry, technology, or commercial infrastructure on the Reservation to provide employment.
  • Rapid City, South Dakota is the nearest town of size (population approximately 57,700) for those who can travel to find work.  It is located 120 miles from the Reservation.  The nearest large city to Pine Ridge is Denver, Colorado located some 350 miles away.

We have bypassed the middlemen; the 501c3s, the red-taped strangled Tribal Councils and the pathetic Federal LIHEAP program which runs out three weeks into winter.

We’ve set up relationships with the propane companies that service Rosebud and Pine Ridge reservation. The kind operators/owners know who needs help and can’t get it from their Tribal, State or Federal government.

Help buy propane for Lakota families in South Dakota:

The *fastest* way to help is to pick up the phone and call with your credit card information. A family will get propane delivered either the same day or the next day.


Telephone:

Sherry Cornelius of St. Francis Energy Co.

at  6 0 5 – 7 4 7 – 2 5 4 2

11 AM – 6 PM MST EVERY DAY

Ask for Sherry or her mom Patsy. Normally a minimum order is $150, but they have an account to accumulate small donations to a minimum order. Credit Cards welcome and they are the only Native owned fuel company on Rosebud.  Rosebud is next to Pine Ridge Reservation and in the same economically depressed condition.

If you’d like to mail a check:

[make check payable to: St. Francis Energy Co.]

Attn: Sherry or Patsy

St. Francis Energy Co. / Valandra’s II

P.O. Box 140

St. Francis, South Dakota 57572

NOT tax deductible

http://sfec.yolasite.com/

 

You can also call Sherry’s cell phone: 605.208.8888 if the above line is busy.

Telephone:

The Lakota Plains Propane Company

at  6 0 5 – 8 6 7 – 5 1 9 9

Monday- Friday only 8-4:30pm MST

Ask for Crystal to contribute to someone from Autumn’s list. $120 minimum delivery. This company serves Pine Ridge Reservation.

NOT tax deductible

If you live out of the country please use our PayPal link at Native American Netroots, the donate button is in the upper right of the page. This process takes about a week for the funds to hit the reservations so telephoning the propane companies directly is the fastest way to help.

Native American Netroots Web BadgeCross Posted at Native American Netroots

 An ongoing series sponsored by the Native American Netroots team focusing on the current issues faced by American Indian Tribes and current solutions to those issues.

red_black_rug_design2

 

More Photos from Rosebud Rez + Propane Drive Update

Cross-posted at Daily Kos

Sherry Cornelius of St. Francis Energy has sent us more photos of our Rosebud rezidents saying

*THANK YOU*

to you all for helping them get through another harsh winter in South Dakota.

One wonderful couple donated $1000 two weeks ago! From my last diary I sent a $700 check collected from our Native American Netroots PayPal link. Many people called St. Francis Energy directly with their credit cards. Sherry said the response has been overwhelming and it appears you are all sharing this outside of Dkos.

Special grand kudos go to Lineatus and her generous Dawn Chorus Birders who raised over $700 for Rosebud. There is currently $1000 in the NAN PayPal account which includes the Dawn Chorus.  I’ll be mailing a very large check STAT.



More photos below and details for you to share so your friends and family can donate also.

Many thanks for the notes of encouragement attached with your donations.

Again, we are helping people who are falling through the cracks with government and tribal assistance.

Everyone here has consented to having their photo taken with the caption THANK YOU DAILY KOS !



Note make shift cardboard skirting around trailer.



Fire truck dealing with a furnace fire

=============================================================

=============================================================

And here’s our intrepid Sherry Cornelius from St. Francis Energy aka lpggirl delivering propane in sub-freezing temperatures.

She knows who needs help.

(Um… no gloves???  I’m such a wimp.)

=============================================================

PLEASE Share with family and friends and ask them to share.

=============================================================

My earlier diaries explain in more detail why and how we are helping:

Here we go again: Blizzard hits Dakotas

Band-Aid for the Lakotas

Pine Ridge: American Prisoner of War Camp #334

Revealing Pine Ridge Rez Demographic Information

Employment Information
  • Recent reports vary but many point out that the median income on the Pine Ridge Reservation is approximately $2,600 to $3,500 per year.
  • The unemployment rate on Pine Ridge is said to be approximately 83-85% and can be higher during the winter months when travel is difficult or often impossible.

    Note that South Dakota boasts of a 4.5% unemployment rate and ranks #2 in the Nation.
  • According to 2006 resources, about 97% of the population lives below Federal poverty levels.
  • There is little industry, technology, or commercial infrastructure on the Reservation to provide employment.
  • Rapid City, South Dakota is the nearest town of size (population approximately 57,700) for those who can travel to find work.  It is located 120 miles from the Reservation.  The nearest large city to Pine Ridge is Denver, Colorado located some 350 miles away.

We have bypassed the middlemen; the 501c3s, the red-taped strangled Tribal Councils and the pathetic Federal LIHEAP program which runs out three weeks into winter.

We’ve set up relationships with the propane companies that service Rosebud and Pine Ridge reservation. The kind operators/owners know who needs help and can’t get it from their Tribal, State or Federal government.

If you live out of the country please use our PayPal link at Native American Netroots, the donate button is in the upper right of the page.

Help buy propane for Lakota families in South Dakota:


Telephone:

Sherry Cornelius of St. Francis Energy Co.

at  6 0 5 – 7 4 7 – 2 5 4 2

11 AM – 6 PM MST

Ask for Sherry or her mom Patsy. Normally a minimum order is $150, but they have an account to accumulate small donations to a minimum order. Credit Cards welcome and they are the only Native owned fuel company on Rosebud.  Rosebud is next to Pine Ridge Reservation and in the same economically depressed condition.

If you’d like to mail a check:

Attn: Sherry Cornelius

St. Francis Energy Co. / Valandra’s II

P.O. Box 140

St. Francis, South Dakota 57572

[make check payable to: St. Francis Energy Co.]

NOT tax deductible

http://sfec.yolasite.com/

 

You can also call Sherry’s cell phone: 605.208.8888

Telephone:

The Lakota Plains Propane Company

at  6 0 5 – 8 6 7 – 5 1 9 9

Monday- Friday 8-5pm MST

Ask for Crystal to contribute to someone from Autumn’s list. $120 minimum delivery. This company serves Pine Ridge Reservation.

NOT tax deductible

Wounded Knee: A Book Review

( – promoted by oke)

There are perhaps three major military conflicts between American Indians and the American military which have entered into popular culture through movies, novels, and popular histories. These would include the battle at the Greasy Grass, also known as the Little Bighorn, where Lt. Col. George Custer was defeated; the 1877 Nez Perce War, which was supposedly led by Chief Joseph; and finally there is Wounded Knee, sometimes called a massacre, sometimes called a battle. The books written about these events are often aimed at romanticizing the Indians, romanticizing the military, and/or presenting a military history of the battle. It is rare for any of these conflicts to be placed in a larger context of either Indian history or American history.

Heather Cox Richardson’s Wounded Knee: Party Politics and the Road to an American Massacre is a book which should be read by all progressives, not because it is about American Indians, or the massacre at Wounded Knee, but because it provides insights into the consequences of partisan politics which are similar to today’s events.  

For those interested in American Indian history, the book provides a good overview of the conflicts between the Sioux and the American government. This overview is not limited to Wounded Knee, but also includes Red Cloud’s War and the American obsession with gold and private property. It also provides some good insights into the nineteenth century reservation system, including the arguments over whether Indian Affairs belonged in the Interior Department or the War Department.

Religious freedom is aspect of the conflict at Wounded Knee. The Indian agent, called Young-Man-Afraid-of-Indians by the Sioux, hit the panic button when he heard about the Ghost Dance. Professor Richardson does a good job of telling the story of Wovoka’s Ghost Dance movement without relying on the imaginative tales told in the nineteenth century popular press.

With regard to the battle, Professor Richardson points out:

“This had been the largest military mobilization of the U.S. Army since the Civil War, involving fully a third of the army. About nine thousand soldiers moved to South Dakota: of those, about five thousand had been stationed at the Pine Ridge agency.”

With regard to the political motivation of this military deployment, she points out:

“Troops brought contracts and government money into the chronically poor West, money that would be most welcome in the current economic depression there. Troop deployment would also show that the administration was looking out for the settlers, promoting their welfare as it had indicated it would do when it pushed so hard for western development.”

Overall, the book looks at Wounded Knee as a part of a larger political process, which is only partly centered on American Indians.

The author points out that:

“Republicans maintained that economic growth created jobs and fueled an ever higher standard of living, pointing to the fabulous houses of the nation’s rich and the increasing wealth evident, for example, in Mrs. Harrison’s jewels, as proof that their system worked. Their opponents, Democrats and members of various reform parties, countered by pointing to falling wages, child labor, and city tenements as evidence that the system was broken.”

‘Individualism, Private Property, the Law of Accumulation of Wealth, and the Law of Competition’ were the very height of human achievement, multimillionaire steel baron Andrew Carnegie cheerfully pronounced.”

“Republicans had adopted into their political worldview the idea that the government’s role was to promote business, and they legislated to do just that. Economic development, they argued, would promote the good of all Americans.”

“The Harrison Republicans were consummate party politicians, willing to ignore reality, manipulate government machinery to stay in power, and destroy those in the way of their plans.”

“Anyone opposing the Republicans’ extreme pro-business policy opposed America, Republicans believed, and must be silenced.”

The political philosophies of the nineteenth century Republicans sound vaguely familiar, like something you could hear on Fox News any night of the week.

I hope that Professor Richardson has a second book in mind, one which looks at the impact of economic philosophies upon American Indian nations during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. I would like to see her follow up on this statement:

“Late nineteenth-century Republicans’ emphasis on specific kinds of economic development ultimately crippled Sioux success in the American economy.”

Remove the word “Sioux” and substitute “Indian” and then document how Republican concepts supporting big business have aided poverty on reservations around the country. This is just a hint that I think Professor Richardson should put the economic development of Indian reservations into this larger picture.  

Pine Ridge: American Prisoner of War Camp #334

Several months ago you donated thousands of dollars to help the Lakota on South Dakota reservations through an extremely harsh winter. You saved lives, thank you so much.

I want to tell you more about the significance of Pine Ridge reservation.

It is ground zero for American Indian issues. Below is a recent powerful presentation by renowned photographer Aaron Huey. After developing a close relationship with some families on Pine Ridge Mr. Huey obtained some astonishing images and they are featured in the video below. Mr. Huey also gives you an important historical time line of the Lakota and ends with a powerful conclusion.

I’m currently reading for review a new book on Wounded Knee that gives a time line of political events leading up to the massacre at Wounded Knee which is located on Pine Ridge. The time line is lengthy and complicated. Below is a concise time line that will help you easily understand these events.

Video below and transcript with several small photos for those on dial up:

From The New York Times LENS feature Behind the Scenes: Still Wounded

Aaron Huey arrived on the Pine Ridge reservation in South Dakota at the start of a self-assigned photographic road trip to document poverty in America.

The poverty he found on the reservation stopped him cold.

“It was emotionally devastating,” Mr. Huey said. “I’d call my wife late at night crying.”

Overwhelmed by the poverty – and at the same time by scenes of people trying to maintain the Lakota way of life – Mr. Huey abandoned the rest of his nationwide project to focus on Pine Ridge. Five years later, he’s still photographing on the reservation, which includes the Wounded Knee massacre site.

Mr. Huey, 33, is a photographer for Smithsonian, National Geographic Adventure and National Geographic Traveler. He also freelances for The New Yorker and Geo. In 2007, he photographed in Afghanistan for The Times.

Regarding the video below:

Challenging us with stunning images, Aaron Huey relates the fight for survival on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. Aaron began photographing on Pine Ridge Reservation as part of a story on poverty in America, but it has captured his passion for five years. A quintessential example of the failures of the reservation system, he and we cannot turn away from what we see at Pine Ridge.

PLEASE watch the video, it is powerful and tells the story of Pine Ridge so well.

Transcript:

We tried to run, but they shot us like we were buffalo.”

-Louise Weasel Bear, Survivor of the Wounded Knee Massacre

My name is Aaron Huey, I am a photographer.

I am here today to show you my photographs of the Lakota.

Pine Ridge Panel One

I’m sure most of you have heard of the Lakota, or at least of the larger group of seven tribes known as the Sioux.  

The Lakota were one of the many tribes that were moved off their land to prisoner of war camps now known as “reservations.”  

The Pine Ridge Reservation, the subject of today’s slideshow, is 75 miles south east of the Black Hills in South Dakota and is sometimes referred to as Prisoner of War Camp #334, it is where the Lakota now live.

If any of you have ever heard of AIM – the American Indian movement- or Leonard Peltier, or Russell Means, or the Wounded Knee takeover, you know that Pine Ridge is ground zero for native issues

I have been asked to talk about my relationship with the Lakota.  That is a very difficult thing for me because, if you haven’t noticed from my skin color,  I’m white.   And that will always be a huge barrier on a Native Reservation.  You will see a lot of people in my photographs today, I’ve become very close with them, they have welcomed me like family.   They called me uncle and brother and they welcomed me back many times over in my five years of visits.   But on Pine Ridge I will always be what is called Wasi’chu. Wasi’chu is a Lakota word that means “Non Indian” but another version of this word means “Takes the best part of the meat.”  And that is what I want to focus on today,  “The one who takes the best part of the meat.”   It means Greedy.

So take a look around this auditorium today.  We are at a private school in the American west.   Sitting in Red velvet chairs.  Pockets full of money.  It is obvious looking at our lives, that we did indeed take the best part of the meat.  

So lets look today at a set of photographs of a group of people who lost so we could gain.  And know when you see these people’s faces that these are not just images of the Lakota, they stand for all indigenous people.

On this piece of paper is the history the way I learned it from my Lakota friends and family.

The following is a timeline of treaties made, treaties broken, and massacres disguised as battles.

I will begin in 1824

What is now known as the Bureau of Indian Affairs was created within the WAR DEPARTMENT, setting an early tone of aggression in our dealings with Native Americans.



1851
 

The first Treaty of Fort Laramie was made, clearly marking the boundaries of the Lakota land.  

According to the treaty, those lands are a sovereign nation.

If the boundaries of this treaty had held, and there is a legal basis that it should, then this   map is what the US would look like.

Ten years later The Homestead Act, signed by President Lincoln, unleashed a flood of white settlers upon Indian lands.



1863

An uprising of Santee Sioux in Minnesota ends with the hanging of 38 Sioux men, >>the largest mass execution in US History.

The execution was ordered by president Lincoln 2 days after he signed the emancipation proclamation.

1866  

The beginning of the transcontinental railroad.  A new era.

We appropriated lands for trail and trains to shortcut through the heart of the Lakota Nation.

The treaties were out the window

In response 3 tribes lead by the Lakota Chief Red Cloud attacked and defeated the US Army many times over.    

I repeat – the Lakota defeated the US Army.

1868  

The second Fort Laramie Treaty clearly guarantees the sovereignty of the Great Sioux Nation and the Lakota ownership of the Sacred Black Hills.  

The govt also promises land and hunting rights in the surrounding states

We promised that the Powder River Country would henceforth be closed to all whites.  

The treaty seemed to be a complete victory for Red Cloud and the Sioux.  

In fact, this is the only war in American history in which the government negotiated peace by conceding everything demanded by the enemy.

1869

The transcontinental railroad was completed; it began carrying, among other things, large numbers of hunters, who began wholesale killing of buffalo.

Eliminating the source of food, clothing, and shelter for the Sioux.

1871

The Indian Appropriations Act makes all Indians wards of the federal government.

In addition The military issued orders forbidding western Indians from leaving reservations.

All western Indians at that point in time, were now Prisoners of War.

Also in 1871  we end the time of treaty making.  The problem with treaties is that they allow the tribes to exist as sovereign nations, and we cant have independent nations inside our own.   We had plans.

1874

General George Custer announced the discovery of gold in Lakota territory, specifically the Black Hills.

the news of gold creates a massive influx of white settlers into the Lakota Nation.

Custer  recommends that congress find a way to end the treaties with the Lakota

1875  

The Lakota War began over the violation of the Fort Laramie Treaty.

1876

On June 25th, on its way to attack a Lakota village, Custer’s 7th Cavalry was crushed at the Battle of the Little Bighorn.

1877  

The Great Lakota Warrior and chief named Crazy Horse surrendered at Fort Robinson. He was later killed while in custody.  

1877 is also the year we found a way to get around the Fort Laramie Treaty.

A new agreement was presented to Sioux chiefs and their leading men under a campaign known as “Sell or Starve”: no signature, no food for your tribe.

Only ten percent of the adult male population signed. The Fort Laramie Treaty called for 3/4 of the tribe to sign away land.   That clause was ignored.

1887

The Dawes Act.  Communal ownership of reservation lands ends. Reservations are cut up into 160-acre sections  AND distributed to individual Indians with the surplus disposed of.

Tribes lost millions of acres. The American dream of individual land ownership was A very cleaver way to divide the reservation until nothing was left.   The move destroyed the reservations, making it easy to further subdivide and sell with each passing generation.  

Most of the “surplus” land, and many of the plots within Reservation boundaries, are now in the hands of white ranchers.  The fat of the land once again goes to Washichu.

1890

A date I believe to be the most important in this slideshow.  This is the year of the wounded knee massacre.

On Dec 29, U.S. troops surrounded a Sioux encampment at Wounded Knee Creek and massacred Chief Big Foot and 300 prisoners of war, using a new rapid fire weapon that fired exploding shells called a  Hotchkiss gun.

For this so-called “battle,” twenty Congressional Medals of Honor for Valor were given to the 7th Calvary.

To this day, this is the most Medals of Honor ever awarded for a single battle.  More medals of honor were given for the indiscriminate slaughter of women and children than in any battle in World War I, World War II, Korea, Vietnam, Iraq, or Afghanistan.  

The Wounded Knee Massacre is considered the end of the Indian Wars.  

Whenever I visit the site of the mass grave I see it not just as a grave for the Lakota or the Sioux, I see it as a grave for all indigenous people of North America.

The Lakota holy man Black Elk said,  

“I did not know then how much was ended.  

When I look back now from this high hill of my old age, I can still see the butchered women and children lying heaped and scattered all along the crooked gulch as plain as when I saw them with eyes still young.

And I can see that something else died there in the bloody mud, and was buried in the blizzard.

A people’s dream died there. It was a beautiful dream.”

With this event A new era in Native American history began.  Everything can be measured by Before Wounded Knee and After, because it was in this moment, with fingers on the triggers of the Hotchkiss guns overlooking that camp, that the US government openly declared its position on Native rights. They were tired of treaties.  They were tired of sacred hills and ghost dances and all other the other inconveniences of the Sioux.  So they brought out their cannons.

You want to be an Indian now, they said.    Finger on the trigger.

1900

The U.S. Indian population reached its low point: less than 250,000, compared to an estimated 8 million in 1492.

Fast forward to

1980  

The longest running court case in U.S. history, the Sioux Nation v. the United States, was ruled upon by the U.S. Supreme Court.

The court determined that when the Sioux were resettled into reservations and 7 million acres of their land were opened up to prospectors and homesteaders, the terms of the second Fort Laramie Treaty had been violated.

The Court stated that the Black Hills were illegally taken, and that the initial offering price plus interest must be paid to the Sioux Nation.

As payment for the Black Hills, the court awarded $106 million to the Sioux Nation.

The Sioux refused the money with the rallying cry “THE BLACK HILLS ARE NOT FOR SALE”

2010

Statistics about the native population today, more than a century after the massacre at Wounded Knee, reveal the legacy of colonization, forced migration, and treaty violations.

Unemployment on the Pine Ridge Reservation fluctuates between 85-90%, the housing office is unable to afford to build new structures, and existing structures are falling apart.  

Many are homeless, and those with homes are packed into rotting buildings with up to five families.  

Thirty-nine percent of the homes on the Pine Ridge Reservation have no electricity.  

At least 60% of the homes on the reservation are infested with black mold.

More than 80% of the population lives below the federal poverty line.

The tuberculosis rate on the Pine Ridge Reservation is approximately eight times higher than the U.S. national average.

The infant mortality rate is the highest on this continent and is about 3 times higher than the U.S. national average.  

Cervical cancer is five times higher than the U.S. national average.  

The school drop out rate is over 70%.  

Teacher turnover is eight times that of the U.S. national average.  

Frequently, grandparents are raising their grandchildren because parents, due alcoholism, domestic violence, and general apathy, cannot raise them.

50 percent of the population over 40 suffers from diabetes

The life expectancy for men is, between 46 and 48 years old, roughly the same as Afghanistan and Somalia.

THE LAST CHAPTER IN ANY SUCCESSFUL GENOCIDE IS THE ONE IN WHICH THE OPPRESSOR REMOVES HIS HANDS AND SAYS “OH NO, LOOK WHAT THEY ARE DOING TO THEMSELVES, THEY ARE KILLING THEMSELVES”   WHILE WE WATCH THEM DIE.

THIS IS HOW WE CAME TO OWN THESE UNITED STATES.  THIS IS THE LEGACY OF MANIFEST DESTINY.  

PRISONERS ARE STILL BORN INTO PRISONER OF WAR CAMPS, EVEN IF THE GUARDS ARE LONG GONE.  

THESE ARE THE BONES LEFT BEHIND AFTER THE BEST MEAT HAS BEEN TAKEN.

A long time ago a series of events was set in motion by a people who look like me.  By WASI’CHU eager to take the land and the water and the gold in the Hills.

Those events lead to a domino effect that has yet to end.  

As removed as we, the dominant society, may feel from the responsibility of a massacre in 1890, or a series of broken treaties 150 years ago, I still have to ask you the question – how should we feel about the statistics of today?

What is the connection between these images of suffering and the history I just read to you?  

How much of this history do you need to own?  

Is any of this your responsibility today?

I have been told “there must be something we can do.”  

There must be a call to action.  

For so long I have been content to stand on the sidelines as a witness, JUST TAKING PHOTOS, because the “solutions” seemed to be buried too far in the past, needing nothing short of a time machine to access them.

The suffering of Indigenous peoples is not a simple issue to “fix.”  

It is not something everyone can get behind in the way they can get behind helping Haiti or ending AIDS or fighting a famine.  

The “fix” may be much more painful for the dominant society than say a $50 donation, or a church trip to paint some graffiti covered houses, or a suburban family donating a box of clothes they don’t want anymore.  

So where does that leave us?  Shrugging our shoulders in the dark?

The United States continues, on a daily basis to violate the terms of the 1851 and 1868 Fort Laramie Treaties with the Lakota.  

The call to action I offer today , My TED wish, is this:

Honor the treaties.   GIVE BACK THE BLACK HILLS

Its not your business what they do with them.


Mr. Huey gave this presentation at the University of Denver on May 13, 2010.

Aaron was also recently named to the short list for the Alexia Prize, as a finalist for the Center for Documentary Studies – Honickman First Book Prize for his work on Pine Ridge, and named to PDN’s top 30 emerging photographers in the world for 2007.  His images of the Pine Ridge Indian reservation were featured in Perpignan at the last Vis d’Or Photojournalism Festival.

Please send your comments and a link to this diary to the committee members below:

CODE:  SENATE INDIAN AFFAIRS COMMITTEE – D.C. ONLY

U.S. SENATE COMMITTEE ON INDIAN AFFAIRS


Main Committee Contact:

Committee on Indian Affairs

Allison Binney, Staff Director and Chief Counsel

United States Senate

838 Hart Office Building

Washington, DC 20510

Phone:  (202) 224-2251

comments@indian.senate.gov

Members:

Byron Dorgan (D-ND), Chair

Washington, D.C. Office:

322 Hart Senate Office Bldg

Washington, DC 20510

Phone (202) 224-2551

Fax (202) 224-1193

John Barasso (R-WY), Vice Chair

Washington, D.C. Office:

307 Dirksen Senate Office Building

Washington, DC 20510

Main: 202-224-6441

Fax: 202-224-1724

Tollfree: 866-235-9553

Daniel Akaka (D-HI)

Washington, D.C. Office:

141 Hart Senate Office Building

Washington, D.C. 20510

Telephone: (202) 224-6361

Fax: (202) 224-2126

Maria Cantwell (D-WA)

Washington, D.C. Office:

511 Dirksen Senate Office Building

Washington, DC 20510

202-224-3441

202-228-0514 – FAX

202-224-8273 – TDD

Toll-Free Number for State Offices:

1-888-648-7328

Tom Coburn (R-OK)

Washington D.C. Office:

172 Russell Senate Office Bldg.

Washington, DC 20510

Main: 202-224-5754

Fax: 202-224-6008

Kent Conrad (D-ND)

Washington, D.C. Office:

530 Hart Senate Office Building

United States Senate

Washington, DC 20510-3403

Phone: (202) 224-2043

Fax: (202) 224-7776

Online: http://conrad.senate.gov/contact

E-mail: https://conrad.senate.gov/cont…

Toll-free Phone: 1-800-223-4457

Mike Crapo (R-ID)

Washington, D.C. Office:

239 Dirksen Senate Building

Washington, DC 20510

Phone: (202) 224-6142

Fax: (202) 228-1375

Al Franken (D-MN)

Washington, D.C. Office:

320 Hart Senate Office Building

Washington, DC 20510

(202) 224-5641

Daniel Inouye (D-HI)

Washington, D.C. Office:

722 Hart Building

Washington, D.C. 20510-1102

Phone: 202-224-3934

Fax: 202-224-6747

Mike Johanns (R-NE)

Washington, D.C. Office:

404 Russell Senate Office Building                      

Washington, DC 20510

Tel: (202) 224-4224

Fax: (202) 228-0436

Hours: 8:30 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. EST

Tim Johnson (D-SD)

Washington, D.C. Office:

136 Hart Senate Office Building,

Washington, DC 20510

Phone:  (202) 224-5842

Fax:  (202)228-5765

John McCain (R-AZ)

Washington, D.C. Office:

241 Russell Senate Office Building

Washington, DC 20510

Main: (202) 224-2235

Fax: (202) 228-2862

Lisa Murkowski (R-AK)

Washington, D.C. Office:

709 Hart Senate Building

Washington, D.C. 20510

Main: 202-224-6665

Fax: 202-224-5301

Jon Tester (D-MT)

Washington, D.C. Office:

724 Hart Senate Office Building

Washington, DC 20510-2604

Phone: (202) 224-2644

Fax: (202) 224-8594

Tom Udall (D-NM)

Washington, D.C. Office:

110 Hart Senate Office Building

Washington DC, 20510

(202) 224-6621

For extra credit please read Land of Enchantment‘s diary:

Dakotas Snow Emergency: Charity and Beyond

Ojibwa’s diaries provide a lot of background also:

Indians 101: A Government Apology?

This diary is dedicated to my dear friend Winter Rabbit for his relentless work on bringing attention to Wounded Knee and other massacres.

The Wounded Knee Massacre: 119th Anniversary

Suicide State Of Emergency On Pine Ridge Reservation

Thank you Mr. Huey for contacting me with a link to your outstanding presentation. I hope many, many people see your TED Talk and contact the Senate Indian Affairs Committee.

I wish I could join you on your next trip to Pine Ridge.

  Cross Posted at Daily Kos
 An ongoing series sponsored by the Native American Netroots team focusing on the current issues faced by American Indian Tribes and current solutions to those issues.

               

Hope and Opportunity on Pine Ridge Rez

Northwest Area Foundation Header

Gary Cunningham, VP and Chief Program Officer of Northwest Area Foundation, responsible for carrying out the foundation’s mission to support efforts to reduce poverty and achieve sustainable prosperity in an eight state Northwest region wrote a recent article on promising programs in action  on Pine Ridge rez and adds a good measure of hope to the many somber reports we have read recently.

Please read his entire post and then I’d like to hear your opinion in the comments, especially if you are a resident of Pine Ridge or neighboring reservations. My questions for the rez residents would be:

1- Do you know about these programs in place on Pine Ridge?

2- Have you seen them in action?

3- Are these programs effective for Pine Ridge?

For neighboring and all other rez residents:



1- Do you have similar programs?

I’m going to list the programs that Cunningham writes about so we can easily refer back to them in the future.

Thunder Valley

:: Thunder Valley Development Corporation ::

…Born out of these spiritual roots, the young people of Pine Ridge have created Thunder Valley Development Corporation to empower Lakota youth and families to improve the health, culture and environment of their community by healing and strengthening of their cultural identity.

 

The overwhelming majority of the Board of Directors and staff are Oglala Sioux.

Once we reached Thunder Valley, Nick Tilsen provided a powerful presentation on building community, empowering young people, and on civic and spiritual engagement. He explained that Thunder Valley Development Corporation has a bold vision of building a planned community on the Pine Ridge Reservation.

If you’d like to help Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation click here.

Native American Natural Foods logo

:: Native American Natural Foods ::

We were then given a tour of Native American Natural Foods, which was founded in 2005 on the Pine Ridge Reservation by owners Karlene Hunter and Mark Tilsen. According to the Native American Natural Foods website, Tanka means “delivering your best with all your heart, mind, body and spirit. It is the choices that you make and the actions that you take to be who you are. Whether you’re Native, white, black, yellow or brown, it is your ability to overcome, to extend a helping hand for those in need, to defeat racism, to protect our Mother Earth, and to love all others on our planet. It is your ability to acknowledge “Mitakuye Oyasin” — we are all related.”

Native American Natural Foods has teamed up with Thunder Valley.


…Thunder Valley E-TANKA café, a partnership between the Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation and Native American Natural Foods, creator of the TANKA bar.

You can order their online products here. I regret to inform you that the Buffalo Hot Dogs are not available online. (Yes, I’m a carnivore…)



:: First Peoples Fund ::

First Peoples Fund image

First Peoples Fund… Lori Pourier, President focuses on:

…the youth who are finding their way through education, community projects and entrepreneurial development. Lori indicated that a lot of “healing that needs to take place.” Lori and others are building the bases for a new renaissance in Indian country.

…First Peoples Fund honors and celebrates native artists who exemplify indigenous values of generosity, wisdom, respect, integrity, strength, fortitude and humility.  

If you’d like to help First Peoples Fund support the advancement of American Indian arts by creating businesses and grant funding click here.

Oweesta logo

:: First Nations Oweesta ::

First Nations Oweesta is a national organization whose mission is to provide opportunities for Native people to develop assets and create wealth by assisting in the establishment of strong, permanent institutions and programs, that contribute to economic independence and strengthen sovereignty for all Native communities The First Nations Oweesta Corporation provides training, technical assistance, investments research and advocacy for the development of Native CDFIs and other support organizations in Native communities. It is working with tribes throughout the country to build a financial infrastructure one individual, one family, one business, one community at a time.

If you’d like to contribute to Oweesta click here.

Other institutions mentioned in this comprehensive article were:

Oglala Lakota College

Pine Ridge Chamber of Commerce

Lakota Funds

I am encouraged by this report of Native individuals building businesses that directly affect their reservations. I also thought it was important to list the many institutions that are making an effort to help our First Nations. Again, I would like to hear from the actual Pine Ridge residents to see if any of this feel good article has actually reached them.

Update: April 8th, Email from Autumn Two Bulls, a resident of Pine Ridge.

I have read this article and it upset me in way. Why it upset me is because not all of our people here on the rez have these advantages as others. There’s so many obsticles to this. I know these programs are offering good positive out reach but we need more of them and to expand them. Here’s and example of the obsticals, no car, live to far out, no babysitter, single parent families, lack of education because of these obstacles. I would like to see these programs try to go into every deep district and do more out reach. I personally know because i live out in the districts. If they can maybe set up a travel out reach to come into the districts maybe lets say 2 times a month this would be great. But as far as i have seen, nothing. This article painted the image that Pine Ridge is not hurting and we are just fine. but that is not the truth.  i know many can get up and help ourselves, well also remember alot of our people are struggling from Genocide, alcoholism, ect. I am not saying my people are bad in any way. Just saying that we need to address these issues first hand. Get healthy and get a good start. So let’s see how far they can reach the people. I know and see what’s going here. Maybe people don’t like what i say but it’s the truth. Not everybody is recieving help from these programs and if anything i asked and alot of them never heard of them. Let’s remember the forgotten people here. I extend my hand and invite out to you to come and see and hear for your selves. You can only know the truth if you experience our hardships yourselves. Maybe this person who wrote this article should come live with us here for a least a year know the truth and go from there. As for our culture it is beating and alive.  more of our youth are picking it up. But we need more than this to bring a whole Nation out of poverty.

Native American Netroots Web BadgeCross Posted at Native American Netroots

 An ongoing series sponsored by the Native American Netroots team focusing on the current issues faced by American Indian Tribes and current solutions to those issues.

                red_black_rug_design2

H/T Oke for finding this article this morning.

Pine Ridge Suicides on NY Times front page? Why Not?

I sent Autumn Two Bulls a message asking how many suicides on Pine Ridge in the last 6 months.  I noticed yesterday that Cornell University had a front page story in The New York Times after three suicides on their campus. All young people at risk for suicide deserve help love and suppport.  But why don’t young people on reservations get visibility when they face a crisis?  New York Times needs some education and awareness training.  

Flooding Begins on Pine Ridge Rez

    http://newsroom.redcross.org/

  Disaster Alert: Floods in South Dakota

   March 11, 2010

   Disaster Alert

   South Dakota – Flooding is expected in Pine Ridge (Indian Reservation) and may affect about 500 people in the small town of Calico.

   The Black Hills Area chapter opened a shelter last night, will be delivering supplies today, and do damage assessment.

http://www.facebook.com/home.p…

Doreen Twobulls  just was notified that red cross is evacuating our commnity due to flooding comming down from the hills.i am amongst 10 other families. im freaking out because the water is getting pretty high and i really hate to leave my home with 6 kids plus the lil one year old im caring for. THIS SUCKS AND SCAREY

Yesterday at 12:59pm

MAKE CNN Cover Winter Emergency In Dakotas

( – promoted by navajo)

Here’s what you get if you go to CNN’s website and search for “South Dakota    tribes  state of emergency   winter storms.” Zero.


CNN Censors Emergency in Dakotas ONLINE ACTION FOR PINE RIDGE RESERVATION TODAY FROM AUTUMN TWOBULLS:

I have been told that your area news and the National news will not carry the story for my people unless and until CNN carries it. Each day someone has told me they have gone to CNN on Facebook, their website, or called into report our story, since the 12/20/09 State of Emergency was issued.

The Press of the past called for the extermination of the American Indian, and was even upset when Custer was killed.


Peter R Decker’s “The Utes Must Go!

Its title drawn from a newspaper advertisement championing the removal of Utes in the Denver Tribune, “The Utes Must Go!” is a powerful true drama of a proud people who suffered from pioneer settlement and racisim, and who also experienced tragedy from misguided intentions, such as Indian Agent Nathan Meeker’s ill-fated attempt to turn Indian hunters into farmers, which brought about tragedy at Milk Creek in 1879.


New York Herald

Who slew Custer? The celebrated peace policy of General Grant, which feeds, clothes and takes care of the their noncombatant  force while men are killing our troops…the Indian Bureau with its thriving agents and favorites as Indian Traders, and its mock humanity and pretense as piety – that is what killed Custer.

The press of today ignores the American Indian, even when a State of Emergency is declared. See Navajo’sEmergency: Ice Storms Devastate Pine Ridge Reservation and Others,where there are some great ways to help out, please do if you can.

What is CNN’s problem?


I am asking that we all come together TODAY, Friday, January 29th, 2010 at 6pm Atlantic; 5pm Eastern time, 4pm Central, etc. pick up your phone and call the direct line to the CNN News Room at 404-827-2658. Someone needs to post here all phone numbers into CNN. We want to inundate CNN with the voices of people who care and you must be relentless in your call. At the same time we want you to handle an email campaign listed below.

Isn’t this big enough?

Here’s the iReport link Autumn Two Bulls mentions.


At the same time that those of you who can afford to call CNN are calling, to those of you who can multi-task or be online, please go now to cnn . com and click on the iReport button and register. If you are on or near one of the Reservations in South & North Dakota, please upload your pictures – but wait – lets all do this together for three full hours.

If it bleeds it leads, unless it’s concerning the American Indian – Right CNN???

Here’s a long list of people at CNN on twitter; furthermore, Here is CNN on Facebook

Once more, Navajo’sEmergency: Ice Storms Devastate Pine Ridge Reservation and Others has some great ways to help out, please do if you can.

I have to say this in a good way, and I have to be honest. I knew someone from this general area who passed away a few years ago, he helped change my life. He stood up for me when others made fun of me; he gave time he didn’t have to give and taught me some things he didn’t have to. His daughter was going to come see him one year and he was excited and a little apprehensive. She never came that year, the year after was the year he died. If I had to imagine what he’d want me to say now, he wouldn’t want me to keep attacking  CNN – that’d make him uncomfortable. All I know for sure is this: hypothermia kills, and he thought he’d see his daughter the year he died.  There’s some people down there I think I’m going to see again, and I pray for their safety and well being.